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Luka Doncic puts in 30 points, 10 rebounds to lead Dallas Mavericks past Pistons, 127-117

DALLAS (AP) — Luka Doncic had 30 points and 10 rebounds, Kristaps Porzingis added 19 points and seven boards and the Dallas Mavericks beat the Detroit Pistons 127-117 on Wednesday night to stop a four-game home losing streak.
Jalen Brunson scored 18 of his 20 points in the first half of a game that was supposed to be played Feb. 17 but was postponed because of severe winter weather in Texas.
“We’ve got to continue to stay positive,” said Brunson, who was 8 of 9 from the floor before halftime. “We have a strong finish to uphold. There’s going to be a lot of trying times. We’ve got to keep it together.”
Jerami Grant scored 26 points and Cory Joseph added 24 for the Pistons, who haven’t beaten a team with a winning record since a 108-102 win at Boston on Feb. 12. Mason Plumlee had 13 points and 16 rebounds.
Grant had 15 points in the first quarter, but foul trouble limited Detroit’s leading scorer to less than three minutes in the second and third quarters combined. The Pistons’ deficit was 16 points by the time Grant finally got back in the flow of the game early in the fourth quarter.

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Michigan Wolverines men’s basketball team rolls past Texas Southern 82-66 on Saturday, date with LSU tonight

By GARY B. GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Juwan Howard loved playing in the NCAA Tournament. Sharing that experience with his players was pretty sweet, too.
Howard got the win in his first NCAA tourney game since taking over at Michigan, guiding Mike Smith and the top-seeded Wolverines to an 82-66 victory over Texas Southern on Saturday.
Smith scored 18 points and Hunter Dickinson added 16 as Michigan rolled into the second round without Isaiah Livers, who is out with a foot injury. Eli Brooks and Brandon Johns Jr. had 11 points apiece.
Howard is back in the tournament for the first time since his stellar playing career with Michigan, including back-to-back Final Four appearances in 1992 and 1993. It’s his second season in charge, but the NCAA Tournament was canceled last year because of the pandemic.
The Wolverines also had to deal with a long layoff this season because of COVID-19 issues in their athletic department.
All the adversity made the March moment even more enjoyable for Howard.
“It means a lot because of what this group has dealt with since last year when we had a pause,” he said. “No one can control the virus but we’ve done a really good job of now having this opportunity to play, being disciplined throughout the process and sacrificing a lot. I’m so proud of these kids and what they’ve dealt with this year.”
Howard and the Wolverines (21-4) had little trouble with the No. 16 seed Texas Southern, but the absence of Livers could lead to adversity down the road. Next up is No. 8 seed LSU on Monday.
“I like how we came out aggressive, played defense,” Smith said. “We played really hard. What I didn’t like was we kind of let up, we kind of played the score and they came back. Obviously, there were some calls that didn’t go our way. We can’t let that hinder us, affect us in a way where we play to their pace.”
The Wolverines used their depth to replace Livers’ 13.1 points per game and floor leadership against the Tigers (17-9).
Michigan never trailed in building a lead that reached 24 early in the second half. The 7-1 Dickinson provided the inside power against the smaller Tigers while Smith and Brooks offered long-distance punch by knocking down 3-pointers.
It wasn’t perfect as Texas Southern outscored Michigan 42-30 in the paint and got within 12 late, causing Dickinson to re-enter the game. Dickinson fouled out, but the Wolverines had more than enough to close it out.
Michael Weathers had 24 points and John Walker III finished with 11 for the Tigers, who were coming off a First Four win over Mount St. Mary’s that gave the Southwestern Athletic Conference school its second NCAA victory.

Michigan’s Brandon Johns Jr., center at left, Terrance Williams II, center, and Franz Wagner, center at right, compete for a rebound with Texas Southern’s Justin Hopkins, bottom left, and Quinton Brigham, bottom right, in their NCAA Tournament game Saturday at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette, Ind. (AP photo)

COMING UP
The Wolverines won the glass 38-28 and forced 10 turnovers leading to 19 points, which helped them lead throughout. They need to finish better as the road becomes tougher from here on out.
Michigan looks to advance to the Sweet 16 for a fourth consecutive tournament when it faces LSU.
“Nobody knows who’s going to win and who’s not,” Wolverines forward Franz Wagner said Sunday. “You can see that with these first couple days of the tournament. Just excited to go out there and play. Whatever happens, happens, but as long as you give it your all, I think you can live with the results.î”
This will be the third meeting between the schools. LSU won the last one in in Maui in November 2017.
The Tigers, who had no problem with St. Bonaventure in the opening round, have been playing their best basketball the past few weeks.
They nearly knocked off Alabama in the SEC title game after beating a higher-seeded Arkansas. The Tigers play good defense and rebound ferociously.

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AP Wire Michigan Headlines

DNR eyes new field office

NEWBERRY, Mich. (AP) — Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources plans to use mass timber technology to build a $5 million field office in the Upper Peninsula.
The building will replace outdated field offices in Newberry, about 100 miles (160 kilometers) east of Marquette.
Mass timber is sustainable and can substitute for concrete and steel, according to the state agency. Large solid or engineered wood columns, beams and panels are used to create multistory buildings from renewable materials.
Construction typically takes less time than traditional concrete-and-steel building because components are manufactured off-site and delivered for installation.
The new building still is in the design stages. It also will house a DNR customer service center. It will include office and garage space and a community room.

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Tracking dog finds cyclist

CASS COUNTY, Mich. (AP) — A search for a motorcyclist who wandered off after a crash ended in a heavily wooded area when a police tracking dog found the man lying in a ditch in a heavily wooded area, authorities in Michigan said.
According to the Kalamazoo Gazette, 28-year-old Travis Herman of Marcellus was riding in Cass County’s Penn Township in southern Michigan on Sunday when he crashed. Sheriff’s deputies who responded to the scene found the motorcycle on Sunday night but were told by a witness that the rider walked away.
A sheriff’s tracking dog, Faust, was brought in to help in the search. The dog found Herman about a quarter mile away lying in a ditch. Herman, who had suffered a head injury, was taken by ambulance to an area hospital. His condition was not immediately known.

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Fewer DNR checks expected

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan wildlife officials won’t be able to check as many deer for chronic wasting disease during the upcoming hunting season.
The state Department of Natural Resources said it’s facing staff and financial shortages as well as challenges from the coronavirus pandemic.
ìWe ask for your patience and grace as we adapt to meet these challenges,î said acting wildlife division chief Dan Kennedy.
The heads of deer taken in certain sections of six counties will be accepted for testing from Oct. 3 to Jan. 4. Those counties are Jackson, Isabella, Gratiot, Delta, Dickinson and Menominee.
Deer heads from Clinton, Dickinson, Eaton, Gratiot, Ingham, Ionia, Jackson, Kent and Montcalm counties will be accepted for state testing only from Nov. 15-18.
Any hunter elsewhere in Michigan who wants a deer tested can submit it to a government-approved lab for a fee, the Department of Natural Resources said. There is information at Michigan.gov/CWD.
The archery season starts Thursday. The traditional firearm deer season starts Nov. 15.

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Detroit man arrested after shooting

DETROIT (AP) — A Detroit man has been arrested after allegedly shooting a 4-year-old girl and a 22-year-old man, police said.
Detroit Police took Devontae Lamar Berrien into custody late Saturday, they said.
Berrien got into an argument with someone on the city’s west side around 7 p.m. Saturday and fired several shots, police said. Berrien left the scene after the girl and man were hit, they said.
The girl and the man were hospitalized in serious condition.

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Michigan Headlines

Several horses displaced by virus, floods find home at rescue farm

WEST BRANCH, Mich. (AP) — Several horses displaced by the pandemic and flooding across parts of central Michigan have found a new home at a rescue farm.
Amid the COVID-19 virus, caretakers began abandoning their pets or placing them with friends and family, the Midland Daily News reported. Between the pandemic and historic flooding in May that destroyed homes, barns, and fields, the situation became harder for owners to properly care for their animals.
Since then, D&R Acres Hobby and Rescue Farm has received several equines. The 20 acre farm and 13,000-square-foot barn and riding facility is now home to 38 horses, donkeys, mules, ponies and miniature horses.
“We’re kind of the retirement home for horses,” said Dolores ‘Doris’ Harris, chief financial officer and founder of D&R Acres, of West Branch.
Animals come to live at D&R Acres because they have either been abused, their owners have died or the owner feels they can no longer take care of them. Although many animals stay at D&R Acres for the rest of their days, the farm does adopt out equines once the animal adjusts to the situation.
“We adopt one out, we get two in,” Harris said.
Harris explained the key is to pair horses up with two or three others to integrate them gently.
“It’s not just giving them a home. We need to re-socialize them,” Harris said.
This year, Harris plans to create 13 new pastures and plant a rescue garden with fruits and vegetables to help volunteers and horses alike. Harris hopes to grow carrots, squashes, pumpkins tomatoes and peppers.

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Michigan Headlines

Michigan village starts flood recovery, awaits funds

LANSING (AP) — Jenna Hulse was at work out of town as a nurse when she got a message from her brother that a dam three blocks from her house in the Michigan village of Sanford was failing.
Six feet of water entered the home, and though Hulse said she’s lucky that the house she’s lived in most of her life is still structurally sound, many other peoples’ homes were destroyed, ripped from their foundations.
“Things aren’t ever going to be normal again. There will be a new normal, I guess, but there’s so much of the village that’s getting torn down. Eventually, the look and feel of it will be different,” Hulse said. “It’s just unfair and disgusting, watching these houses get torn down that I’ve been looking at my whole life.”
Hulse is among the 859 Sanford residents whose lives were upended when privately owned dams with a history of neglect failed in May, resulting in more than $200 million damage in Midland County.
When the floodwaters roiled the Tittabawassee River, much of the attention focused on the larger downstream city of Midland, home to Dow Chemical Co. But many in Sanford are still scraping up muck and debris as they wait to find out whether any government aid may come their way.
In mid-June, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer asked President Donald Trump to declare a major disaster, which would open up federal resources and financial support for the area. Michigan has not yet received a response to Whitmer’s request.
Legislation to allocate $6 million in state funds to the Midland area, mostly for housing, is sitting in a committee, with the Legislature adjourned for the summer.
Hulse said that when the floodwaters hit, countless volunteers in the village went to work helping her and families like hers by providing meals and supplies, and removing debris.
“The mud was unbelievable. It was slimy and it left this film on anything,” Hulse said. “A lot of the stuff that you thought, ‘Well maybe I’ll clean this off and keep it,’ you can’t even, you can’t.”
Sanford, being so small, has already spent more than its yearly budget on debris cleanup alone.
Emily Ricards created a Facebook page to organize volunteer work. Although state or federal government aid would be a huge help, Ricards said Sanford could not wait. Midland County has a history of salt and gravel mining, and local excavating companies are helping to clean up the debris.
“If we would have waited we’d still be sitting and in three foot of muck,” Ricards said.

FILE – In this May 21, 2020 file photo, Sanford resident Connie Methner, owner of CJ’s Hairstyling, bows her head as she copes with the damage after water flooded her salon to its ceiling in Sanford, Mich. Sanford village, with a population of 859, is pulling together after the devastation of two dam failures in May. Volunteers are still clearing muck and providing supplies to those whose homes were destroyed since there’s no telling when major state and federal help will come. (Jake May/MLive.com/The Flint Journal via AP File)
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Michigan Headlines

Boat at bay bottom to be removed

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A sunken boat must be removed from the bottom of Grand Traverse Bay in northern Michigan, according to state officials.
Federal and state authorities said Thursday they are working to arrange the salvage operation for the 33-foot-long vessel that sank last month, the Traverse City Record-Eagle reported.
Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy spokesman Nick Assendelft said officials “don’t want that left in the water.”
The boat took on water June 19 and sank. The 10 people on board were rescued by the Coast Guard.
The boat’s owner, Todd Elsenheimer, said he has insurance on the lake cruiser and his plan all along has been to remove it from the bay.
The sunken boat continues to be monitored and it does not appear any of the 70 gallons of fuel believed to be on board has leaked, according to the Coast Guard.

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Michigan Headlines

Whitmer calls for end to chokeholds, other police reforms

LANSING (AP) — Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer called Monday for an end to the use of police chokeholds and limiting no-knock warrants.
The recommendations come as states have been considering ways to prevent racial bias and address police brutality in the wake of George Floyd’s death. The move follows efforts earlier this month to expand a commission that sets policing standards.
The Democrat’s plan calls for categorizing racially motivated 911 calls harassing individuals as hate crimes, requiring ongoing training for law enforcement to maintain a license and directing state health officials to recommend best practices for police when dealing with a person with mental illness, according to a news release.
“All Michiganders, no matter their community or the color of their skin, deserve equal treatment under the law,” Whitmer said, adding her plan would ensure police “treat all Michiganders with humanity and respect.”
Earlier in June, Whitmer added civilians and the director of the Department of Civil Rights to the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards.