Categories
Florida Sports

Dolphins take Alabama’s Waddle, Miami’s Phillips in draft

By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer
DAVIE, Fla. (AP) — Jaylen Waddle is headed to the Miami Dolphins to provide a dynamic target for his former Alabama teammate, Tua Tagovailoa.
The Dolphins selected Waddle with the sixth overall pick Thursday night, choosing him over another Alabama receiver, Heisman Trophy winner DeVonta Smith. It’s the highest Miami has ever taken a wideout.
“He has been a dynamic, explosive player, even from his freshman year,” Dolphins general manager Chris Grier said. “We love his athletic ability, his run after catch, his speed, his toughness. He plays with passion and energy. This guy is someone we had our eye on the last three years.”
The Dolphins used the 18th pick to take the University of Miami’s Jaelan Phillips, the first edge rusher drafted.
A social media video showed Tagovailoa grinning when the selection of Waddle was announced.
“J-Dub. Yessir!” Tagovailoa said with a laugh.
“He’s going to make me better,” Waddle said, “and I’m going to make him better. We’re going to push each other.”
Tagovailoa, the No. 5 overall draft pick in 2020, became Miami’s No. 1 QB in Week 8 and went 6-3 as the starter.
The speedy, 5-foot-9, 180-pound Waddle played in only six games last season because of a broken left ankle, but returned to play in the national championship game, catching three passes despite a limp to help Alabama beat Ohio State.
“It shows the character and how important football is to him,” Grier said.
“A lot of players would have opted not to play.”
Waddle averaged 44.5 yards on his 17 touchdown receptions in three seasons with the Crimson Tide, and scored three times on kick returns.
Elusive after the catch, Waddle may be used primarily as a slot receiver. He said he is often compared with three-time All-Pro Tyreek Hill of the Kansas City Chiefs.
“But I want to be my own player and do my own style, and not emulate someone else’s style,” Waddle said.
Smith was taken 10th by the Philadelphia Eagles. He and Waddle were both were in Cleveland, where the draft was held.
“It’ís a special moment to share with your brother,” Waddle said, his voice breaking. “It makes the moment even more special, more emotional.”
Waddle’s speed gave him an edge in choosing between the two, Grier said.
“It’s the explosiveness that Waddle gives you, as well as the return game, that dynamic trait,” Grier said.
Since 2018, Grier has selected four Alabama players in the first two rounds, including defensive tackle Raekwon Davis and safety Minkah Fitzpatrick.
Phillips’ career was nearly derailed at UCLA by concussions, but he returned to football with the Hurricanes last year and had eight sacks and 15 1/2 tackles for a loss.
“When you watch him play, you would never question his passion,” Grier said. “He plays 100 mph and has a tremendous motor. We’re very excited to have him.”
The 6-6, 260-pound Southern California native said he was thrilled to be taken by the Dolphins.
“I just moved all my stuff out of Coral Gables back to L.A., and now I’m coming back to Miami,” Phillips said with a laugh. “L.A. made me, but Miami saved me. I owe a lot to this city. There is no place I’d rather be than the 305.”
Phillips said his history of concussions is nothing to worry about, and credited his comeback from the injuries to perseverance.
“I kept my faith, stayed humble and had great people around me,” he said.
Dolphins owner Stephen Ross pledged two years ago to build through the draft, and that remains the approach after the team doubled its 2019 win total to 10 last year. The Dolphins have two more picks in the second round Friday, which will give them four of the top 50.
Miami originally had the No. 3 overall pick, but Grier traded down to 12th and then back up to sixth.
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Categories
Florida Sports

Jaguars open NFL draft, Meyer era by drafting Lawrence

By MARK LONG
AP Pro Football Writer
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — The Jacksonville Jaguars waited more than four months to make the easiest and maybe most significant pick in franchise history.
As obvious as it was, fireworks and frivolity followed.
A sold-out draft party that included 8,000 fans celebrated wildly as NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell stepped to the podium and announced Trevor Lawrence’s name as the first pick in the draft Thursday night.
The Clemson star had a more subdued reaction in Seneca, South Carolina — probably because he knew, like everyone else, that he would be the first pick in the NFL draft.
“It was just a kind of a weight lifted off my shoulders,” Lawrence said. “I’m going to do everything in my power to get us back to where we need to be. I’m going to put in the work. No one’s going to work harder than me.”
The Jags added one of Lawrence’s college teammates, standout running back Travis Etienne, with the 25th pick in the first round. The move pairs two of the most productive players in Clemson history as centerpieces of coach Urban Meyer’s offense.
“I don’t have to get to work on getting to know somebody else,” Etienne said. “I know Trevor inside and out.”
Lawrence and Etienne became the first QB-RB combination from the same school to go in the first round of the same draft in the modern era, according to the NFL. Together, they should help Jacksonville improve an offense that ranked last in the NFL in 2020 with just 16 explosive plays.
“I’ve always had a very strong belief in speed,” Meyer said, making it clear that Etienne will be used as much as a receiver as a ball-carrier. “The idea for offense is to create matchup nightmares. He’s as good outside as a receiver as he is as a running back.”
Lawrence was the fourth quarterback drafted by the franchise in the first round in its 27 years of existence, joining Byron Leftwich (2003), Blaine Gabbert (2011) and Blake Bortles (2014).
The chance to draft Lawrence was one of the factors that lured Meyer out of the broadcast booth and got him back on the sideline. Jacksonville has five of the top 65 picks, including three in the second and third rounds Friday night.
No matter who else the Jaguars bring in, none of them will compare to Lawrence. He’s now the face of the franchise for the foreseeable future. And Jacksonville is counting on him solving the team’s decades-old problem at the all-important position.
“I don’t have any expectations for anything other than myself,” Lawrence said. “I’m not expecting anyone to hand me anything. I want to come in there and earn the respect and trust of my teammates and the right to lead the team.”
Meyer spoke to Clemson coach Dabo Swinney, who initially had four words for his former college coaching colleague.
“Don’t screw it up,” Swinney said.
“This will be a very easy transition” for Lawrence, Swinney added. “What he’s stepping into, the expectations, all those things, that’s his normal. And it has been for a long time. He’s built the right way. … He’s the epitome of consistency. And if you know anything about Urban Meyer, he values consistency and toughness. I didn’t have to sell him on his toughness.”
Lawrence enjoyed a stellar college career, going 34-2 as Clemson’s starter and leading the Tigers to three Atlantic Coast Conference titles and the 2018 national championship.
He completed 66% of his passes for 10,098 yards, with 90 touchdowns and 17 interceptions. He also ran for 18 scores.
The Jaguars locked up the No. 1 pick in the next-to-last week of the 2020 NFL regular season, and Lawrence was the target long before Meyer was hired to replace Doug Marrone.
Meyer, general manager Trent Baalke and owner Shad Khan never tipped the obvious pick, but they didn’t try to disguise it, either.
Meyer said they made the decision in early February.
The Jaguars already gave Lawrence a playbook and held several Zoom sessions with him. Even Khan sat in on at least one, getting to know a player he’s prepared to guarantee nearly $40 million in a four-year deal.
Lawrence was the fourth quarterback Jacksonville drafted in the last four years, following Tanner Lee (2018), Gardner Minshew (2019) and Jake Luton (2020). Minshew and Luton remain on the roster, but Lawrence is expected to start from Day 1.
He should be a significant upgrade for a franchise that has endured Gabbert, Chad Henne, Blake Bortles, Cody Kessler, Nick Foles, Minshew, Luton and Mike Glennon as starters over the past decade.
“I’m just pumped,” Lawrence said. “The best is yet to come.”
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Categories
National News

US ‘Real ID’ deadline is now May 2023 because of COVID-19

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans will have more time to get the Real ID that they will need to board a flight or enter federal facilities.
The Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday extended the Real ID deadline until May 3, 2023. The deadline had been Oct. 1, 2021, but it was becoming clear that many people wouldn’t make it, in part because the COVID-19 outbreak has made it harder for states to issue new licenses.
Congress passed the Real ID Act in 2005 to establish minimum security standards for state-issued driver’s licenses and ID cards following a recommendation from the 9/11 Commission.
The updated cards will be required for airport check-in and to enter federal facilities.
People are getting compliant IDs as they renew, but it takes time and the process has been slowed by the pandemic, with many state agencies operating at limited capacity.
DHS says only 43% of all driver’s licenses and identification cards are compliant.
Older IDs will be suitable to allow people to drive, buy liquor or other age-regulated products, and gamble at casinos. Travelers also can use military IDs or passports to access flights and federal facilities.

Categories
Florida Sports

Buccaneers select LB Joe Tryon with last pick of first round

By FRED GOODALL
AP Sports Writer
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — The Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected Washington linebacker Joe Tryon Thursday night in the first round of the NFL draft, No. 32 overall.
With no glaring needs after keeping the core of the roster together in free agency, the Super Bowl champions are looking to add promising prospects who’ll have time to develop while Tom Brady and a deep, talented cast around the quarterback try to become the first club to win consecutive NFL titles since the 2003 and 2004 New England Patriots.
The 6-foot,5, 262-pound Tryon opted out of playing at Washington last season due to the coronavirus pandemic, but is a versatile linebacker who eventually will be counted to make a relentless pass rush spearheaded by Shaquil Barrett and Jason Pierre-Paul even better.
“It’s nice to stockpile on edge rushers. … You can’t have too many of those guys,” general manager Jason Licht said. “He’s big, he’s athletic, plays very hard. …. We felt like he was a player who if he played (last) year and had similar production or better his value really would have gone up.”
With all 22 starters returning for next season, the Bucs entered the draft without any weaknesses that needed to be addressed with their top pick. That’s uncharted territory for a franchise that missed the playoffs 12 consecutive seasons before signing Brady in free agency in March 2020 and assembling an all-star roster that helped the 43-year-old quarterback win his seventh Super Bowl title in February.
Licht and coach Bruce Arians defied the odds of retaining all of the team’s key players by placing the franchise tag on receiver Chris Godwin, signing Barrett and fellow linebacker Lavonte David to multi-year contracts and bringing back tight end Rob Gronkowski, running back Leonard Fournette, defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh and receiver Antonio Brown on one-year deals.
Kicker Ryan Succop also re-signed, and Licht navigated a tight salary cap situation to hold on to a number of reserves who could have left via free agency, too.
With all that out of the way, the goal now is to bolster depth by adding draft picks who potentially could contribute on special teams as rookies and compete for starting jobs in 2022 and beyond.
“We’ll take our time with him,” Licht said, reiterating that the Bucs won’t rush Tryon’s development. “When he’s ready, he’ll be out there taking on a bigger role.”
The GM also said he’s not concerned about Barrett, Pierre-Paul and the rest of the defense embracing the addition of another pass rusher.
“Those guys are awesome. They’re going to do whatever they can to make the team better,” Licht said, adding that Barrett and Pierre-Paul, who’s under contract for one more season, are in ‘no danger of losing their starting jobs.”
Tryon said he can’t wait to begin working with the veteran linebackers.
“I can’t wait to be a sponge, soak it all,” said Tryon, who was picked just after midnight, which technically means he was selected on his 22nd birthday.
While conceding it’s difficult to predict how many rookies might be able to make a roster with so many starters and key reserves returning, Arians nevertheless expects to come out of the draft an even stronger team.
“When you go back and look at the film, we have so many things to correct from last year,” Arians said last week. “There was steady growth, but we’re nowhere near where we could possibly be if we have a great offseason and stay healthy and continue to build a ton of depth.”
The team’s top two draft picks — first-round offensive tackle Tristan Wirfs and second-round safety Antoine Winfield Jr. — became immediate starters.
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Categories
International Headlines

Report: Boris Johnson’s phone number was online for 15 years

LONDON (AP) — The British government downplayed allegations Friday of a security risk after it was reported that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s cellphone number was openly available on the internet for 15 years.
Celebrity website Popbitch revealed that the number was on a think tank press release from 2006, when Johnson was an opposition lawmaker and the Conservative Party’s higher education spokesman.
Callers to the number on Friday heard an automated message saying the phone was “switched off” and telling them to try later or to send a text.
The government denied there was a security lapse. Home Office minister Victoria Atkins insisted that the prime minister “knows his responsibilities when it comes to national security.” and she criticized media for revealing the fact that the number was in the public domain.
Treasury chief Rishi Sunak said that “as far as I’m aware, all security protocols have been followed.”
“Part of what makes the prime minister special is that he is an incredibly approachable individual,” Sunak said.
But former National Security Adviser Peter Ricketts said that if the number was widely available, it could be used for eavesdropping by hostile nations “and possibly other non-state actors as well, like sophisticated criminal gangs.”
Johnson is already facing questions about his text and WhatsApp message exchanges with business leaders and lobbyists.
He has denied doing anything wrong when he exchanged text messages with industrialist James Dyson last yaer and promised he would “fix” the tax rules for Dyson if he agreed to make ventilators for the National Health Service.

Categories
International Headlines

Counting the costs of America’s 20-year war in Afghanistan

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — America’s longest war, the two-decade-long conflict in Afghanistan that started in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, killed tens of thousands of people, dogged four U.S. presidents and ultimately proved unwinnable despite its staggering cost in blood and treasure.
This final chapter, with President Joe Biden’s decision to pull all American troops from Afghanistan by the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks, has prompted a reckoning over the war’s lost lives and colossal expenditure.
Here’s a look at the spiraling cost of America’s campaign — the bloodshed, wasted funds and future consequences for the war-battered nation teetering on the brink of chaos.
THE COST IN LIVES
Afghans have paid the highest price. Since 2001, at least 47,245 civilians have been killed in the war as of mid-April, according to the Costs of War project at Brown University, which documents the hidden costs of the post-9/11 wars.
Gun and bomb attacks targeting civilians surged to previously unseen heights since the intra-Afghan peace negotiations opened in Qatar last fall, according to the U.N. Watchdogs say the conflict has killed a total of 72 journalists and 444 aid workers.
The Afghan government keeps the toll among its soldiers secret to avoid undermining morale, but Costs of War estimates the war has killed 66,000 to 69,000 Afghan troops.
The war has forced 2.7 million Afghans to flee abroad, mostly to Iran, Pakistan and Europe, the U.N. said. Another 4 million are displaced within the country, which has a total population of 36 million.
Meanwhile, 2,442 U.S. troops have been killed and 20,666 wounded in the war since 2001, according to the Defense Department. It’s estimated that over 3,800 U.S. private security contractors have been killed. The Pentagon does not track their deaths.
The conflict also has killed 1,144 personnel from the 40-nation NATO coalition that trained Afghan forces over the years, according to a tally kept by the website iCasualties. The remaining 7,000 allied troops also will withdraw by Biden’s 9/11 deadline.
THE COST IN DOLLARS
The U.S. has spent a stunning total of $2.26 trillion on a dizzying array of expenses, according to the Costs of War project.
The Defense Department’s latest 2020 report said war-fighting costs totaled $815.7 billion over the years. That covers the operating costs of the U.S. military in Afghanistan, everything from fuel and food to Humvees, weapons and ammunition, from tanks and armored vehicles to aircraft carriers and airstrikes.
Although America first invaded to retaliate against al-Qaida and rout its hosts, the Taliban, the U.S. and NATO soon pivoted to a more open-ended mission: nation-building on a massive scale.
Washington has poured over $143 billion into that goal since 2002, according to the latest figures from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR).
Of that, $88 billion went to training, equipping and funding Afghan military and police forces. Another $36 billion was spent on reconstruction projects, education and infrastructure like dams and highways, the SIGAR report said. Another $4.1 billion has gone to humanitarian aid for refugees and disasters. The campaign to deter Afghans from selling heroin around the world cost over $9 billion.
Unlike with other conflicts in American history, the U.S. borrowed heavily to fund the war in Afghanistan and has paid some $530 billion in interest. It has also paid $296 billion in medical and other care for veterans, according to Costs of War. It will continue to pay both those expenses for years to come.
FOLLOWING THE MONEY
Much of the billions lavished on huge infrastructure projects went to waste, the U.S. inspector general discovered. Canals, dams and highways fell into disrepair, as Afghanistan failed to absorb the flood of aid. Newly built hospitals and schools stood empty. Without proper oversight, the U.S. money bred corruption that undermined government legitimacy.
Despite the costly counternarcotics campaign, opium exports reached record heights. Despite the billions in weapons and training to Afghan security forces, the Taliban increased the amount of territory they control. Despite vast spending on job creation and welfare, unemployment hovers around 25%. The poverty rate has fluctuated over the years, reaching 47% through 2020, according to the World Bank, compared to 36% when the fund first began calculating in 2007.
“We invested too much with too little to show for it,” said Michael Wahid Hanna, a senior fellow at the Washington-based Century Foundation.
THE COST OF LEAVING
Although few want to prolong the war interminably, many fear its final end may jeopardize Afghanistan’s modest gains in health, education and women’s rights, made in the early years as the U.S. expanded the economy and toppled the Taliban, which had imposed tough strictures on women.
Since 2001, life expectancy has increased to 64 years from 56, the World Bank says. Maternal mortality has more than halved. Opportunities for education have grown, with the literacy rate rising 8% to roughly 43%. Life in cities has improved, with 89% of residents having access to clean water, compared to 16% before the war.
Child marriage has declined by 17%, according to U.N. data. Girls’ enrollment in primary school has nearly doubled, and more women have entered college and served in Parliament. These figures still pale compared with global standards.
But more broadly, the failure of America’s ambitions to build a stable, democratic Afghanistan has left the country mired in uncertainty as U.S. forces leave. The nation’s history tells of civil war that follows foreign invasions and withdrawals.
“For better or worse, the U.S. has a serious stabilizing presence right now, and once that’s gone there’s going to be a power vacuum,” said Michael Callen, an Afghanistan economy expert at the London School of Economics. “In the 20 years’ war, there’s going to be a whole lot of scores that need to be settled.”

Categories
International Headlines

Russia targets lawyer over media comments on treason case

By DARIA LITVINOVA Associated Press
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities have launched a criminal probe against a lawyer representing a former Russian journalist accused of treason and the team of imprisoned opposition leader Alexei Navalny, accusing him of disclosing information related to a police investigation.
St. Petersburg-based lawyer Ivan Pavlov told reporters Friday he was formally charged with the criminal offense, punishable by a fine, community service or detention of up to three months, after his Moscow hotel room was raided on Friday morning and he was summoned to Russia’s Investigative Committee for interrogation.
Pavlov was ordered to appear in a Moscow court later on Friday for a hearing on pre-trial restrictions. According to the court’s press service, the authorities are seeking to bar Pavlov from using the internet and communicating with witnesses in his criminal case.
Pavlov’s colleague, Yevgeny Smirnov, had reported that the lawyer was detained. But Pavlov’s spokesperson, Yelizaveta Alexandrova-Zorina, later clarified to The Associated Press that Pavlov formally wasn’t arrested even though he was de-facto detained in his hotel room during the search.
Opposition supporters, independent journalists and human rights activists have been facing increasing government pressure in Russia. Raids targeting Pavlov and his team elicited outrage in the Russian legal and human rights community, with prominent lawyers and legal aid groups calling on authorities to stop “using the law as a tool of pressure on lawyers.”
Pavlov said the accusations against him were connected to his defense of Ivan Safronov, a former Russian journalist charged with treason in a case that has been widely seen as retribution for his journalistic work. He said he was targeted because he shared information about the case with the media.
“The investigators maintain that I committed a crime when I told you, reporters, that your colleague is being unlawfully held in Lefortovo (pre-trial detention center) on absurd accusations,” the lawyer said.
Safronov, who wrote about military and security issues for a decade before becoming an adviser to Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin, was detained last year and accused of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence. Many journalists questioned the charges, and his former newspaper openly rejected them as “absurd.”
Safronov’s former colleagues alleged that authorities may have sought revenge for his reporting that exposed Russian military incidents and opaque arms trade deals. Safronov has remained in pre-trial detention since July.
Pavlov had been due to appear in a Moscow court on Friday at a hearing about extending Safronov’s pre-trial detention. The lawyer said police unlawfully seized “almost the entire dossier” of documents related to the case during the hotel room raid, including those subject to attorney-client privilege.
According to his colleague Smirnov, Pavlov frequently received threats from investigators at Russia’s Security Service, or FSB, with an investigator involved in the case against the former journalist allegedly saying to the lawyer, “We’re going to do everything to put you behind bars.”
Pavlov maintained his innocence and said he considered the case against him “revenge” for his work on cases investigated by the FSB.
Smirnov told the AP that persecution of Pavlov sends a signal to all lawyers: “Don’t even think about working effectively on criminal cases. Don’t even think about speaking out. Don’t even think about defending people — your role as a lawyer should be like that of furniture … present at legal proceedings.”
In August, Russian media reported that the FSB had lodged a complaint against Pavlov over his refusal to sign a non-disclosure statement in Safronov’s case. Pavlov said at the time that he had signed a statement not to disclose state secrets in connection to the case, but no one had asked him to sign a broader non-disclosure statement.
The case against Pavlov was opened shortly after he started representing the Foundation for Fighting Corruption, founded by President Vladimir Putin’s longtime foe, opposition leader Navalny.
This month, the Moscow prosecutor’s office petitioned the Moscow City Court to outlaw Navalny’s foundation and his network of regional offices as extremist groups. The move is part of a sweeping crackdown on Navalny, his allies and his political infrastructure.
Navalny is currently serving time in a penal colony outside Moscow. He was arrested in January upon his return from Germany, where he had spent five months recovering from a nerve agent poisoning he blames on the Kremlin. Russian officials have rejected the accusations.

Categories
National News

St. Louis couple who confronted protesters back in court

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A St. Louis couple accused of waving guns at racial injustice protesters last summer are due back in court Friday, when a judge will consider whether to send the case back to a grand jury to decide if they should have been indicted in the first place.
A St. Louis grand jury indicted Mark and Patricia McCloskey in October on felony charges of unlawful use of a weapon and tampering with evidence. Their attorney, Joel Schwartz, filed a motion this month seeking to remand the case to the grand jury, citing “bias” in St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office that he said tainted the grand jury process.
It wasn’t clear ahead of Friday’s hearing when Circuit Judge David Mason would issue a decision. Schwartz and Special Prosecutor Richard Callahan — who was appointed months after the October indictment — declined to speculate.
Demonstrators were marching to the home of then-Mayor Lyda Krewson on June 28, amid nationwide protests after police killed George Floyd in Minneapolis. The protesters ventured onto a private street that includes the McCloskey mansion. The couple, both of them attorneys in their early 60s, said they felt threatened after protesters broke down an iron gate and ignored a “No Trespassing” sign. Protest leaders denied damaging the gate and said the march was peaceful.
Mark McCloskey came out of his home with an AR-15-style rifle and Patricia McCloskey emerged with a semiautomatic handgun. Cellphone video captured the confrontation.
Gardner said the display of guns risked bloodshed. A police probable cause statement said protesters feared “being injured due to Patricia McCloskey’s finger being on the trigger, coupled with her excited demeanor.”
Schwartz, from the outset, alleged that the prosecution was politically motivated.
Callahan, a longtime judge and former U.S. attorney, was appointed special prosecutor after a judge in December ruled that Gardner created an appearance of impropriety by mentioning the McCloskey case in fundraising emails before the August Democratic primary. Gardner went on to win reelection.
The McCloskeys emerged as celebrities in conservative circles. They spoke on video during last summer’s Republican National Convention, and Missouri Gov. Mike Parson has vowed to issue pardons if they are convicted.
Politico recently reported that Mark McCloskey is considering running for the Senate in 2022, after Republican Sen. Roy Blunt announced in March he would not seek reelection.

Categories
National News

Arizona: 1 officer killed, 1 hurt by suspect in stolen car

GILBERT, Ariz. (AP) — A suspect in a stolen car struck and killed one officer and critically injured another during a wild chase involving gunfire and multiple law enforcement agencies in the suburbs of Phoenix, authorities said Thursday.
Chandler Police Officer Christopher Farrar was killed and a Gilbert Police officer was hospitalized in critical condition, their departments said.
“Chris was struck and killed by a violent felon in a stolen vehicle following a multi-agency shooting and pursuit,” Chandler Police Chief Sean Duggan said.
The suspect was injured while finally being taken into custody as several officers engaged in gunfire, Gilbert Police spokesman P. Alaniz said. An employee at a Ford dealership also was among the injured, Alaniz said.
The pursuit began when a Pinal County deputy pursued the vehicle in the Eloy area and was fired upon, Alaniz said, stressing that the crime remains under investigation.
“He continued pursuit into the city of Chandler where the suspect drove into the airport and busted through a gate going into the airport, causing the airport to shut down,” Alaniz said.
The suspect then got back on a highway into Gilbert, where he broke into the SanTan Motorplex and stole a vehicle from the Ford dealership there, running over the two officers as he tried to get away, Alaniz said.
Duggan said his slain officer had touched many lives during his 18 years on the force.
“I just ask that you keep Chris’s family in your thoughts and prayers, and take a moment and be mindful of the brave men and women who are out there daily helping keep our communities safe,” the chief said.

Categories
National News

Anne Douglas, widow of late actor Kirk Douglas, dies at 102

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Anne Douglas, the widow of Kirk Douglas and stepmother of Michael Douglas, died Thursday in California. She was 102.
Douglas died at her home in Beverly Hills, according to an obituary provided by spokeswoman Marcia Newberger. No cause of death was given.
Kirk Douglas, the Hollywood legend who starred in “Spartacus,” “Lust for Life” and dozens of other films, died in February 2020 at 103.
He married Anne Buydens in 1954 after they met in Paris while he was filming “Act of Love” and she was doing publicity. They had two sons, Peter, a producer, and Eric, an actor.
“I often wonder what would have happened to me if I hadn’t married Anne. I might not have survived without her business acumen and her finely-honed instincts,” Kirk Douglas once said.
In 2017 the couple published “Kirk and Anne: Letters of Love, Laughter, and a Lifetime in Hollywood.”
The Douglas Foundation, which Anne and her husband co-founded, has donated millions to a wide range of institutions, from Children’s Hospital Los Angeles to the Motion Picture & Television Fund.
Michael Douglas said his stepmother “will always be in our hearts.”
“She brought out the best in all of us, especially our father. Dad would never have had the career he did without Anne’s support and partnership,” the actor said in a statement.
Kirk Douglas’ first wife and Michael’s mother, Diana Douglas, died in 2015.