The smart way to job hunt while you have a job

It’s easier to job hunt if you have a job. It’s a maxim, but it’s backed up: statistics have shown that employers are more likely to hire people who already have jobs, and a 2017 survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York determined that about 23% of job seekers are already employed. So […]

It’s easier to job hunt if you have a job. It’s a maxim, but it’s backed up: statistics have shown that employers are more likely to hire people who already have jobs, and a 2017 survey by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York determined that about 23% of job seekers are already employed.

So if you’re ready for a job change and hoping to join that group, how do you go about it?

6 tips for looking for a new job while still on the job

Be discreet

This should be obvious, but it should always be top-of-mind as you look for a new gig. If your boss finds out that you’re unhappy and looking, that can make your current situation very uncomfortable—very fast. So make sure you’re keeping everything on the DL; no griping loudly about how much you hate this place, no telling everyone but your boss that you’re halfway out the door.

It may be that you need references for your job hunt, and as mentioned, you probably can’t tell your boss. So what about other colleagues? Choose carefully. Select one or two people who can speak to your abilities and professional skills, but who will also be discreet. Office gossips need not apply. And make sure that when you talk to this person, you emphasize that you need them to be discreet and not tell anyone else that you’re thinking about your exit plan. Most people get it—remember, 23% of employed people are out looking for new opportunities, and turnover is a fact of life at virtually every company. If you’re not sure that someone is entirely trustworthy, don’t risk it. Go outside the company for a reference.

You still have to work while at work

Don’t spend your time combing job search sites while you’re supposed to be working. Many employers have full access to everything you search online while using company devices, so if you wouldn’t want your IT department handing a list of links to your boss, don’t spend your work day scanning job sites.

Instead, use your own phone or tablet during lunch, or on other breaks.

Don’t use your work email address as a contact for new job leads

Ideally, you have a respectable name@[anyemaildomain].com account set up for your personal use. That’s what you should use for your job search because again, you don’t want your job hunt to become public knowledge, and your work emails are typically the property of your employer.

Schedule interviews outside of work hours whenever possible

This can be tricky, because business hours are when most hiring work is done. But if a late-day or early morning interview just isn’t possible, we’ve all done the “I have a dentist appointment” fib to go to an interview.

Don’t telegraph that you’re interviewing

When you’re leaving for that “dentist appointment,” it’s a pretty big tip-off if you just happen to be wearing your best suit. If you can, change outside the office after you leave and before you get back.

Don’t start slacking at your current job

When you’re focused on the future, it can be tempting to do less now. That will almost definitely backfire. If your standard of work drops, you risk causing damage to your reputation. And if you don’t get that new job right away, you’re stuck with the consequences of that in your everyday professional life. It’s a kind of self-sabotage. So even though you may be frustrated or unhappy about your current situation, do as much as you can to maintain the status quo while you figure out your next steps. Don’t forget, you may need these colleagues as references or part of your network later on, so don’t burn bridges now.

Looking for a job while you have a job is common, and it can be challenging, with what feels like cloak-and-dagger activity. But if you’re able to balance your current work with your stealth search on the side, it’ll be even sweeter when you find that perfect new opportunity.

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Eight things super-powerful women never do

Everyone could benefit from a little more power and confidence in the workplace, but studies have shown that women in particular tend to be more hesitant about wielding the kinds of skills and behavior typically associated with leaders. If you’re looking for a way to boost your own presence at work and feel more in […]

Everyone could benefit from a little more power and
confidence in the workplace, but studies have shown that women in particular
tend to be more hesitant about wielding the kinds of skills and behavior typically
associated with leaders. If you’re looking for a way to boost your own presence
at work and feel more in control of your career, here are some of the things
that badass, powerful women never do.

1. They don’t downplay their achievements

Many women feel like talking openly about their achievements is arrogant or braggy. On the contrary, owning your success (and the steps you took to get there) is one of the most effective ways to advance your career. Being open about your success gives you concrete accomplishments you can point to in job interviews or raise negotiations.

2. They don’t avoid confrontation

Openly disagreeing with someone (like a colleague or
superior) may feel aggressive and out of line, but debate can be healthy—and
someone else isn’t necessarily right simply because they’re saying it in
public. If you disagree, or have a differing perspective, don’t be shy about
saying so (in a professionally appropriate way, of course).

3. They don’t trash others to get ahead

What was true in high school is still true in the workplace: smack talkers always get caught up in the drama in the end. Spreading rumors or denigrating others just so you might look better is not a good look for anyone. And if others know or think you can’t be trusted, you can expect the same treatment from others. Power comes from succeeding—not from stepping on other people.

4. They don’t let criticism derail them

At some point, everyone comes up against some harsh
criticism, a bad review, or a professional rejection of some sort. That doesn’t
have to define you or your career. Powerful people take the criticism for what
it is, learn what they can, make adjustments, and move on.

5. They don’t let abusive behavior go unchecked

Whether it’s something as serious as harassment or simply not standing up to inappropriate behavior at work, calling it out doesn’t make you a snitch or a weak-looking victim. If you see or experience behavior that makes you uncomfortable, it’s on you to decide how to best approach it—whether that’s reporting through a Human Resources process or voicing your discomfort with the person directly.

6. They don’t internalize mistakes as personal failings

If something goes wrong at work, it doesn’t necessarily mean that your personality or skills are defective. The power move is to acknowledge what happened (“This was a choice I made, and this is why it was wrong.”), correct the course, and move on. Work fails are not necessarily personal fails.

7. They don’t fear failure

Failing at something is demoralizing for everyone, no matter how confident you normally are. But truly powerful people have confidence in their skills and abilities, and understand that failure isn’t a game-ender. Instead, think of it as a game-changer. It’s a chance to regroup, rethink, and be better.

8. They don’t let self-doubt run the show

Everyone has self-doubt sometimes. Every. Single. Person. The trick is not letting that derail your progress by hesitating and overthinking what your next steps are. Sometimes you have to overrule your doubting brain and go with your instincts. You have skills and experience that are guiding you—don’t let that get pushed out by that little voice saying, “But what if I’m wrong/not talented enough/not prepared?”

Confidence and power are within reach for all of us—all personalities, experience levels, and walks of life. At the root of all of it is knowing who you are, what you bring, and what you want to achieve. You know better than anyone what you’re capable of achieving. Don’t be afraid to be bold!

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10 in-demand skills you need to get hired—fast

If you feel like your job hunt is floundering or you find yourself in a position where you need to find a new job ASAP, one of the best things you can do is focus on your skills. Even more than experience, skills are often what gets you into an interview—and, ideally, into a new […]

If you feel like your job hunt is floundering or you find yourself in a position where you need to find a new job ASAP, one of the best things you can do is focus on your skills. Even more than experience, skills are often what gets you into an interview—and, ideally, into a new gig. LinkedIn recently did a survey of hundreds of thousands of job postings on their site and identified the skills most in demand by today’s employers. If you’re looking to get more impact on your resume and job applications, these skills are a great place to start.

Hard skills

Hard skills, or the specific, teachable skills that you’ve acquired through school, training, or experience, are the hardest to “fake it ‘til you make it.” Typically, these skills can be boosted through specific training or education, but this also makes them an easier skill type to build because they’re so specific. All of these skills can be learned through online courses. According to LinkedIn, these are the top five hard skills sought by employers.

Cloud computing

All the data lives in the cloud now, which means people with engineering skills who can wrangle, understand, and leverage the massive amounts of cloud data in an efficient way will be highly valued.

Artificial intelligence

From digital assistants in our home to hiring platforms, artificial intelligence is the method of choice for making work more efficient and accessible. Machine learning is taking over in every industry, as employers look for ways to reduce human effort (and human error) in their processes.

Analytical reasoning

Now that every corporate decision seems to be data-based,
that means people with the skills to take all of that raw information and turn
it into meaningful, impactful decisions will be in high demand with employers.

People management

Something that will never change is the need to manage
people at all levels of an organization. And although “leadership” is a soft
skill (more on that in a bit), you can build very specific skills that will
make you a better manager and leader.

UX/UI design

User experience design, or UX design, is crucial for the way
people receive information, shop, organize their lives, browse online, or use
devices. As companies put more resources into finding the right app layout or
the best customer experiences, having design skills will make you a strong
candidate in our digital-first society.

Softs skills

These are the less concrete skills—the people skills. Soft skills are the personal attributes you need to work with others and be successful in the workplace. Although they’re not as easy to learn as, say, a specific software platform or mastery of a tool, you can still build these as well through courses and practice. According to LinkedIn, these are the top five soft skills sought by employers.

Creativity

Creativity, or the ability to solve problems with basic human ingenuity, is one of the things that all the AI and data in the world won’t be able to replace completely. It’s also a challenge if you’re not already a creative problem solver. However, courses about the creative process, and how to generate ideas, can help train your brain to think more creatively.

Persuasion

Always be selling, right? Whether you’re selling your team
on an idea or a product to a customer, you’ve got to be able to identify why
they need it, how it benefits them, and why it saves time/money/effort/etc. And
oh yeah, you also have to present it in an engaging way. Persuasive skills will
also help you when it comes time to negotiate for a raise or a promotion, by
the way. Courses in human behavior or consumer behavior can help you refine
your pitches and build your persuasiveness.

Collaboration

Every employer out there wants people who can play well with others. You can hire all the hot shots you want, but if everyone’s butting heads all the time or doing their own thing without regard for others, no real work is going to get done. Collaboration and teamwork are one of the fastest-growing skills identified as high-priority by hiring managers. If you’re a lone wolf type or just want to learn how to interact with people more effectively, courses in effective communication, professional collaboration, or team dynamics can help.

Adaptability

Like teamwork, adaptability is highly prized by employers,
who want to be increasing efficiency and results all the time. Adaptability is
also a key element of innovation, another big-ticket priority for most
employers. Flexible thinking may not be your default mode, though, so if you
find yourself clinging to “the old way” of doing things, seminars on strategic
agility and developing adaptability in yourself and others can make you a more
flexible thinker and worker.

Time management

This is one of those skills that just about everyone could stand to improve. Balancing projects, balancing work and life, and managing deadlines so that things get done well and on time are all crucial skills in every industry. Building this skill is not quite a simple as writing up a calendar or schedule, but there are courses on finding time management strategies that work for your personality that can help you manage your time and count it as a marketable skill.

Whether you don’t yet have these skills or just want to shine them up so that you can feature them proudly on your resume, online courses are an effective way to do that—especially if you’re feeling a time crunch. The more time you spend developing these skills now, the sooner you’ll have the most in-demand skills and opportunities rolling in.

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Getting ahead: planning your retirement in your 20s

Have you ever heard the old saying that it’s never too early to start planning for the future? If so, you may have decided to ignore it, or just worry about it later—after all, when you’re young you feel as if you have an endless amount of time to plan your life and that your […]

Have you ever heard the old saying that it’s never too early to start planning for the future? If so, you may have decided to ignore it, or just worry about it later—after all, when you’re young you feel as if you have an endless amount of time to plan your life and that your time is better spent having fun and living for the moment. But the truth is, the future is coming faster than you might realize. When it comes to retirement planning, the phrase “never too early to start planning” can be the best advice you’ll ever get.

Sure, there are a lot of reasons why it’s especially tricky to start planning for such a far-off notion like retirement. The truth is, you’re likely just getting started in your professional journey, and you may have little to no idea where your climb up the career ladder will take you. Also, if you’re like most of us, the money you’re earning when you’re new to the work world doesn’t exactly leave you with a ton of options for saving and investing for the future. On top of all this, it is much more fun to be carefree and live for the moment when you’re young, and many of us make a deal with ourselves to start taking money matters seriously when we reach a significant (and distant) milestone in our lives (age 30? 40? 70?).

That said, you really don’t have to completely overhaul your life or give up on fun in order to start planning for retirement but the more prepared you are for this inevitable end to your career journey the more confident and relaxed you’ll be about money matters at every phase of your life until then. Taking baby steps toward greater financial responsibility while you’re in your 20s will bring you that much closer to whatever your retirement goals turn out to be—and help you avoid (or at least minimize) the amount of fear, worry, and anxiety you feel when you’re focused on your financial health and future. And trust us, if those days aren’t here yet, they’re right around the corner.

If you’re ready to take the next step and get serious about your retirement planning, then consider the following strategies to move you in the right direction.

4 steps to planning for retirement now

1. Develop a saving mindset.

Sure, when you’re in your 20s it’s hard to take savings seriously. Most likely, your main focus is on getting your bills paid and being able to afford the basics, and that makes total sense. However, even saving just a little bit can go a long way.

Let’s take a look at a small example—suppose you enjoy a mid-afternoon latte each workday. The average price of a latte is around $2.50. Now, instead of buying the latte, imagine taking that money and dropping it into a savings account—in 5 years, you’ll have saved $3,250 just by making this one small life change. Are there other small savings changes you can make to help you build your nest egg? Probably, and the more money you’re able to divert to savings the better off you’ll be—both for short-term needs and for long-term health as you creep closer to retirement. But perhaps more importantly, just getting into a savings mindset early on in life will set you up for being a more financially responsible adult as you get older—and your ability and desire to save and spend wisely will set you up for a great financial future.

2. Take advantage of work resources

Most of us aren’t thrilled to have to work, but one of the good things about having to hold down a job is that it can often come with some useful employee benefits—which may include a retirement benefits plan. These days, more and more companies are offering a 401(k) plan to help employees save and prepare for retirement, which often provide some incredible perks like employer fund matching (which is as close to free money as most of us will ever get).

Taking advantage of investing in a 401(k) is so universally recognized as beneficial (and often essential) that many companies automatically enroll employees in plans to help them start saving their money wisely. If your company offers this benefit, there is absolutely no good reason not to take advantage of it—even if it’s just a small percentage of your paycheck. Don’t worry if you don’t plan on staying at your current job forever—you get to take your money with you.

3. Explore other investment options

In addition to the retirement benefits that your employer may offer, consider exploring other investment options available to you: IRAs, mutual funds, CDs, and the stock market. Sure, it’s a little scary to jump into the world of investing as a newbie, but there are a wealth of resources available to you, including online tools, wise and trusted friends and family members, and investment professionals tied to your bank (assuming you have a savings or checking account—and if you don’t, consider opening one). Do some research and start small. You’ll be amazed by how well a few wise investment decisions early on in life can set you up for a comfortable retirement.

4. Decrease debt

Debt is not your friend. Even though it’s often an unavoidable part of adulthood, be sure to make every effort to decrease your debt burden as you move closer and closer to retirement age. The truth is, some forms of debt—like a home mortgage—are indicative of financial stability and solvency. But other forms (like credit card debt) are best left avoided or eradicated as quickly as possible. If you have a credit card (or multiple cards), avoid using them unless it’s an unavoidable emergency, and pay off what you owe as quickly as possible. Nothing creates a financial headache and panic attack faster than an unwieldy amount of unhealthy debt—so be sure to avoid drowning here.

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10 of the most in-demand jobs for 2019

As we make our way into 2019, you may be thinking about what your next step is, career-wise. If you’re looking to make some changes, here are some of the hottest and fastest-growing jobs and fields to consider. Medical Services Manager The job outlook doesn’t get much hotter than in healthcare right now. And with […]

As we make our way into 2019, you may be thinking about what
your next step is, career-wise. If you’re looking to make some changes, here
are some of the hottest and fastest-growing jobs and fields to consider.

Medical Services Manager

The job outlook doesn’t get much hotter than in healthcare right now. And with booms in technology and an aging population, it’s a field that will be growing for decades to come. Medical services managers, also known as healthcare administrators, hold a lot of power and responsibility for the nation’s healthcare. They work in hospitals or other medical facilities and coordinate medical and health services for patients. They provide the infrastructure for medical personnel to work with patients, and may manage a clinic, an entire hospital, or a group of physicians.

These managers handle administrative tasks and ensure that medical care follows healthcare laws, regulations, and technology. The demand for medical services managers is expected to grow 20% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
A bachelor’s degree is recommended, and a background in healthcare is an asset.

What they make: The
median annual salary is $98,350, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Nursing Assistant

With much of the Baby Boomer population aging and needing
advanced medical care, nursing assistants provide valuable boots-on-the-ground
services. These aides help provide basic medical care in hospitals or other
medical facilities, like nursing homes. Tasks may include helping patients with
everyday tasks (like feeding, bathing, or dressing), transporting patients, and
preparing patients for treatments or procedures. The demand for nursing
assistants is expected to grow 11% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

What you’ll need: Completion of a nursing assistant educational or training program, plus passing a certification exam.

What they make: The
median annual salary is $27,510, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Fitness Trainer

On the everyday end of the health and wellness trend are
professionals like fitness trainers. Trainers help people develop and maintain
fitness and wellness plans, teach fitness classes, and educate clients on healthy
lifestyle choices. The demand for fitness trainers is expected to grow 10% by
2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
A high school diploma or equivalent, plus on-the-job training. Trainers may
also need to pass a certification test, depending on your state’s requirements.
You should also be in good physical condition.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $39,210, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Software Developer

Technology rules our lives, and the information sector job outlook is growing as well. Software developers are responsible for the design and user experience of various computer programs and systems. The demand for software developers is expected to grow 24% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need: Software developers typically have a bachelor’s degree in information technology or a related field.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $103,560, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Statistician

Statisticians help manage the data of everyday life and help turn it into meaningful, actionable information. Statisticians can be found in government agencies or private industries, gathering data and using theories and models to predict outcomes and guide decision-making. They typically combine mathematical expertise and technology to wrangle data. The demand for statisticians is expected to grow 33% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
Statisticians typically have a master’s degree in statistics or mathematics,
although you may be able to start with a bachelor’s degree in one of these
fields.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $84,760, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Nurse Practitioner

Nursing is a field where there’s a continuous need for qualified professionals, and nurse practitioners are one of the most in-demand segments of the nursing population. Nurse practitioners are advanced nurses who can provide specialized care, similar to physicians. Nurse practitioners provide primary or secondary care, and in some cases can prescribe medications and treatments. The demand for nurse practitioners is expected to grow 33% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
Nurse practitioners typically have a master’s degree in a nursing specialty,
and must also pass a national certification exam, plus meet state licensing
requirements. Each state has its own requirements, so be sure to check your own
state’s.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $110,930, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Occupational Therapy Assistant

In occupational therapy, patients work on a prescribed
recovery plan to recover from illness or injury, including working on daily
skills or physical strength. Therapists and their assistants work directly with
these patients, developing and implementing treatment plans as well as
physically assisting patients. The demand for occupational therapy assistants is
expected to grow 28% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
Occupational therapy assistants typically have an associate’s degree from an
accredited occupational therapy assistant program, plus on-the-job training. Individual
states may have different licensing requirements, so be sure to check yours.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $56,690, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Market Research Analyst

Companies rely on customer and market data to make crucial
business decisions. This is where market research analysts come in. These
professionals take raw data and apply knowledge of the industry, customer base,
and other factors to determine trends, pricing, and customer reaction. The
demand for market research analysts is expected to grow 23% by 2024, per the
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
Market research analysts typically have a bachelor’s degree in marketing or
economics, although some advanced positions may require a master’s degree. A
strong set of math and analytical skills is essential as well.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $63,230, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Construction Laborer

If you’re looking for a career that’s more hands-on, the
construction industry will continue to grow this year. Construction laborers
work on building or construction sites, doing physical labor to build or
repair. The demand for construction laborers is expected to grow 12% by 2024,
per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need:
There is usually no specific educational requirement for entry-level
construction worker jobs, although there is usually an on-the-job training
component to develop skills and practice safety. This is also a very physically
demanding job, so you should be able to perform heavy physical tasks.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $33,450, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

Medical Technician

Not all essential healthcare roles are found in doctors’ offices or hospital clinics; some are way behind the scenes. Working in laboratories, medical technicians (also known as medical lab scientists or medical lab technicians) process samples and analyze bodily fluids or other biological materials. The demand for medical technicians is expected to grow 13% by 2024, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What you’ll need: Medical technicians typically need an associate’s degree or a certificate from a certified training program, plus completion of a licensing process. Individual states may have different licensing requirements, so be sure to check yours.

What they make:
The median annual salary is $51,770, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.

If 2019 has you itching for a new path in your career, there
are lots of growing, thriving industries that could be a fantastic fit for you
and your goals.

The post 10 of the most in-demand jobs for 2019 appeared first on TheJobNetwork.

7 learning styles and how to teach them

Attention teachers—are you making the most of your time in the classroom? The truth is, if you’re applying a “one size fits all” approach to teaching then you’re probably not making the most effective use of your abilities. Today’s most effective teachers realize that their classrooms are actually microcosms of students with a range of […]

Attention teachers—are you making the most of your time in the classroom? The truth is, if you’re applying a “one size fits all” approach to teaching then you’re probably not making the most effective use of your abilities.

Today’s most effective teachers realize that their classrooms are actually microcosms of students with a range of learning styles—and each student has a specific way of absorbing and processing new information that they respond to best. It can be challenging, but teachers who make a real effort to reach each student by taking their individual learning style into account are best positioned to have a positive and lasting impact in their classrooms.

In general, there are seven recognized learning styles—and a range of useful strategies for engaging learners who respond best to each. If you want to maximize learning in your classroom and help your students achieve their goals, consider devoting some time to figuring out which of the following learning styles works best for each and build a program that takes this important information into account.

Visual/Spatial

A visual learner responds well to seeing new concepts and ideas in visual form—things like charts, tables, figures, and diagrams that incorporate helpful colors and shapes—and learn best by seeing things laid out in front of them. Visual learners are typically observant, creative, and well-organized people who are focused and enjoy carefully laid out plans.

If you’re eager to engage a visual learner, make sure your learning program incorporates helpful visual aids and cues and encourage students to use visual tools themselves during the learning process—including sketching out ideas and using note taking and drawing (think flowcharts and mind maps). Also, consider placing them at or near the front of your classroom and decorate your classroom with lots of visual aids.

Solitary/Intrapersonal

These students typically straddle a range of learning styles (including logical, physical, verbal, auditory, and visual learning). How can you spot this type of learner? These are typically private, independent, and introspective students who are driven by self-motivation and self-determination. They often seem like they’re well-suited for tasks like programming, coding, researching, and writing.

The truth is, although it can be challenging to fully engage a solitary learner in a crowded classroom, do your best to guide them through the use of visual learning tools, books, designated quiet areas for self-study, and clearly defined sharing/solitary time in the classroom—it will be time well spent.

Verbal

If you’re working with a verbal learner, don’t forget that words matter most to them—in all of their many written and spoken forms. These learners are typically intellectual and bookish sorts who show a clear preference for writing and reading, so incorporating things like text-based lessons, vocabulary and word activities, and poems are good ideas. It shouldn’t be a surprise that many of these learners wind up in careers involving law, journalism, politics, and writing and administration.

If you’re working with a verbal learner be sure to have verbal and written discussions of new concepts and ideas. Take into account if they’re naturally introverted or extroverted—the more outgoing they are, the more they’ll benefit from presentations and interactive talking, while introverted verbal learners will likely respond well to things written down. Be sure to use this information to your teaching advantage.

Physical/Kinesthetic

These energetic learners enjoy the “hands-on approach,” and enjoy physical and tactile activities to support their learning. They typically gravitate towards athletic pursuits. Look for ways to incorporate learning tools that engage their senses and include movement when possible. Role-playing tends to work particularly well with physical learners—although this can be a challenge in a classroom full of students. If you can find a way to make use of these strategies you’ll tend to be more successful at engaging these learners.

Logical/Mathematical

These data-driven, number-focused learners typically are logical and successful in the classroom and veer towards careers in research, science, accounting, and programming. They respond well to puzzles, brain teasers, and tasks involving pattern recognition, classification and grouping, statistics, and numerical and hierarchical information. Aim to incorporate these in your lesson plans whenever possible.

Social/Interpersonal

These types of learners are typically
easy to spot—they have a natural predilection for teamwork and interacting and
collaborating with their classmates. Although social learners tend to be natural
leaders, extroverts, and good communicators, this isn’t a hard a fast rule and
can really vary. Another thing worth noting is that social learners can respond
well to other learning styles, usually set in a collaborative/interpersonal
backdrop. Try incorporating a variety of group activities within your lesson
plans to benefit these learners.

Auditory/Musical

These learners tend to respond really well to audio-based lessons, cues, and stimuli. They often prefer to have things explained to them out loud, and really do well with activities that incorporate talking, audio recordings, and music. Your voice and the voices of others in the classroom are great tools when working with auditory learners. Although maintaining a quiet and orderly classroom can be important, your best bet when trying to engage these learners is to incorporate some well-placed sound into your lessons.

If you’re looking to better engage your students and maximize learning in your classroom, consider factoring in the diverse learning styles covered here when developing your lesson plans.

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The power of building relationships at work

For most of us in the work world, our jobs aren’t exactly solo missions. Unless you’re a one-person show or your own boss in a lean start-up, chances are you’re part of a team, one whose members all utilize their individual abilities and skill sets collaboratively in pursuit of a common goal—to ensure the success […]

For most of us in the work world, our jobs aren’t exactly solo missions. Unless you’re a one-person show or your own boss in a lean start-up, chances are you’re part of a team, one whose members all utilize their individual abilities and skill sets collaboratively in pursuit of a common goal—to ensure the success of your company.

Most of us will have opportunities to work with a wide range of people and personalities over the course of our careers. Some we get along with right off the bat; some we learn to appreciate and work well with over time; and some we might not nominate for “person of the year,” but we make an effort to not let differences get in the way of doing our jobs with them effectively. If you’ve spent any amount of time in the workplace, you’ve likely come to realize that building and maintaining solid relationships with coworkers is not only beneficial, it’s absolutely essential.

Bonding makes us work harder

Building and maintaining positive relationships is a huge contributing factor to our satisfaction, productivity, and success at work. Harvard Business Review recently reported that “When people feel like they belong at work, they are more productive, motivated, engaged and 3.5 times more likely to contribute to their fullest potential, according to our research at the Center for Talent Innovation.” It can also mean the difference between getting chosen for new work opportunities and promotions and getting passed over for someone else with a more enviable work profile.

Simply put, connections in life and at work matter, and those of us who are viewed as team players and have lots of strong relationships with colleagues—including higher ups, peers at the same level, and subordinates—are best positioned for long-term happiness and success.

Work life has a large effect on overall mood

Beyond these obvious work relationship benefits, people simply crave positive connections with the people whom they work with and interact on a regular basis. Humans are social animals after all, and we thrive when we feel we’re accepted and appreciated by others; conversely, we’re susceptible to a range of negative effects when we fail to forge significant connections with others, including unhappiness; decreased energy, motivation, and enthusiasm; and depression—and it isn’t hard to envision the unfortunate ripple effect this can have on your satisfaction and performance at work.

Working well with others is often mandatory

There
are also practical reasons for building good relationships with your colleagues.
Most of us work on projects and initiatives that span coworkers, teams, and
departments, which means that your success is tied to your ability to
collaborate effectively with your fellow stakeholders. Strong positive
relationships typically bode well for project success, while tension between
colleagues can be a real impediment to successfully completing a project on
target.  

Hopefully, by now, it’s clear that building positive relationships at work can benefit you in a host of ways, and that it’s in your best interest to make this a real goal—both to improve your happiness and well-being at work as well as to improve your chances of long-term career satisfaction and success. So, make an effort to enhance your professional network and forge solid connections with your coworkers and you’ll be sure to reap the benefits!

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The difference between a tough boss and a bad boss

Those of us who have been in the work world for a while know all about the dreaded “difficult boss”—the boss who fills your thoughts with misery when you think about coming into work each day. The boss who somehow manages to make every work project and task more annoying and less enjoyable for everyone […]

Those of us who have been in the work world for a while know all about the dreaded “difficult boss”—the boss who fills your thoughts with misery when you think about coming into work each day. The boss who somehow manages to make every work project and task more annoying and less enjoyable for everyone involved, and who’s skilled at chipping away at your confidence, self-esteem, and optimism with every encounter. Most of us have had the misfortune of having a difficult boss in our orbits and know just how unfortunate this reality can be.

In fact, having a difficult boss may actually be worse for you than you even realize. Forbes recently published an article that highlighted a recent study by the University of Manchester’s Business School that uncovered a wide range of negative effects from having a toxic boss. These include higher rates of depression and negativity, lower job satisfaction, worse job performance, and a more pessimistic professional outlook—and the ripple effects spill out of the office and all over employees’ personal lives in a variety of detrimental ways. Clearly, having a difficult boss is not an ingredient for a happy life.

That said, not all difficult bosses are created equally. In fact, a clear distinction should be made between the two types of difficult bosses—tough bosses and bad bosses. The short- and long-term effects they can have on you can be completely different, so it pays to know the difference. Let’s take a closer look at each of these two breeds of boss and see what makes each type tick.

How to handle bad bosses

Most of us know a flat-out bad boss when we see them, and the truth is that beyond a paycheck and perhaps bolstering our resumes, there’s very little upside to working with them. They’re constantly and consistently working to bring out the very worst in us and drain us of every last drop of energy and enthusiasm. Maybe it’s out of greed and selfishness for their own needs, with no regard for ours, or maybe they’re just simply terrible at being people and get some satisfaction from seeing us unhappy and squirming.

Regardless of their motives, the end result of working with a bad boss is often the same—you spend way to much time trying to make them happy, which is often an elusive and unattainable goal, and you’re left miserable in the process. You often get nothing in return from the interaction and, even worse, it affects your entire life negatively. Like in any toxic relationship, you often come out of the bad boss experience shell-shocked and worse for wear, and it can take a while to shake off the ill effects.

If this sounds like your situation, after diagnosing the problem you should see if there are any steps you can take to either improve the situation or minimize the impact. If there aren’t, consider whether or not it’s worth sticking it out. If not, figure out an exit strategy.

How to handle tough bosses

This breed of difficult boss doesn’t
always make your professional life happy or fun, but there’s a significant
difference between a bad boss and a tough boss. Where interacting with a bad
boss is a toxic exchange that benefits you in no discernable way, having a
tough boss can actually have the opposite effect—they can challenge you to be
your best self, step out of your comfort zone, and build new and better
professional skills. Tough bosses often have lofty demands and high
expectations for both you and their companies, but is that such a bad thing? In
fact, in some cutthroat industries where the level of competition is insanely
high, having a tough boss at the helm can mean the difference between a company
that navigates its way to success and a company that can’t distance itself from
the crowd.

Tough bosses often expect results and require a commitment to seeing things through to the end, regardless of whatever adversity or challenge rears its ugly head. But learning to face these things head-on can be great additions to your professional skill set—both at this job and in your future endeavors. Sure, there are limits, and there’s often a fine line between a tough boss and bad boss. But if the truth is that your boss often gets on your nerves and drives you crazy, but they’re actually helping you build better skills and are turning you into a better employee, then try to appreciate what you’re getting from this exchange and do your best to learn how to work with them in a way that minimizes the awfulness and allows you to continue to benefit from the situation.

If you have a difficult boss, use the information here to diagnose whether your boss is tough or just plain bad. Then, take the necessary steps to make your professional life as fulfilling, beneficial, and stress-free as possible.

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4 careers for the hopeless romantic

This is the time of year when people tend to have romance on the brain. Flowers! Jewelry commercials! Ads for upscale restaurants! If you’re a hopeless romantic, it’s kind of like the Super Bowl. But what if you want to turn those lovey-dovey feelings into a career, something you can build professionally? Believe it or […]

This is the time of year when people tend to have romance on
the brain. Flowers! Jewelry commercials! Ads for upscale restaurants! If you’re
a hopeless romantic, it’s kind of like the Super Bowl. But what if you want to
turn those lovey-dovey feelings into a career, something you can build
professionally? Believe it or not, there are options out there for you.

4 careers for people who love romance

1. Wedding/special event photographer

If you have a knack with a camera, being a wedding
photographer gives you a front-row seat to some of the happiest days of
people’s lives. Everyone’s dressed up, people are (usually) on their best
behavior, and your goal is to capture the romance for posterity. Plus, being a
photographer has the advantage of being a flexible career, or side business,
with many weddings and special events happening outside of standard business
hours.

What you’ll need: High-quality cameras and related equipment,
plus training on how to use it. Courses on professional photography are highly
recommended.

What it pays: The median salary is $32,490 per year, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

2. Florist

Florists and floral designers are usually the go-to retailers for romantic life
events, with busy seasons around holidays like Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day,
etc. Floral designers are there for the good, the bad, and the celebratory,
providing flowers and delivery to a range of customers.

What you’ll need: Workers in a retail floral shop will need the
basics (a high school degree and  customer
service skills). If you’re looking to become a floral designer, you’ll likely
need vocational courses and on-the-job training. Creativity and artistic flair
are very helpful, as are good customer service skills to help your customers
find the right way to say it with flowers.

What it pays: The median salary for floral designers is $26,350
per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

3. Chocolatier/Candymaker

If you’re more interested in food service than flower
service, you may want to consider becoming a chocolatier. This is not the most
common path in food service, but what’s more romantic than high-quality
chocolates to go with those flowers and gifts? Chocolatiers are artisans who
create edible masterpieces, playing with flavors and structures to create the
perfect bite.

What you’ll need: To become a chocolatier, you’ll need a solid
base in the culinary world, and may need to complete a pasty chef course.
You’ll also need to meet your state’s licensing and food handling regulations,
so be sure to check what your state requires.

What it pays: The median salary for chocolatiers is $21,000 per
year, but experienced pastry chefs can make more.

4. Marriage counselor

Sometimes love needs a little help, and marriage counselors are licensed health care professionals who can help couples work on their relationships. This is not a job for the starry-eyed romantic who thinks all relationships are a romcom-ending away from happiness, but rather a practical career for someone who believes that therapy and hard work together can overcome challenges in love and life. Plus, health care careers are a very stable, practical bet for long-term career longevity.

Marriage and family therapy in particular is a field that’s growing—the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the number of jobs in this area will grow more than 23% by 2026.

What you’ll need: Marriage and family therapists typically have
a master’s degree or higher, plus complete an internship or residency. Licensing
requirements may vary by state, so be sure to check your own state’s
requirements.

What it pays: The median salary for marriage and family
therapists is $48,790, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

If you love the very idea of love, there are ways to live that out in your professional life as well. Choosing a career that helps make other people happy can be a key to long-term career satisfaction. If you have the skills and the inclination to work in one of these service fields, you may find yourself with even more love to go around.

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Ten ways to practice self-care at work

When you hear the phrase “self-care,” you might think of personal things like meditation, indulging in something decadent, yoga, a spa day, or taking time for a good book. But when you think about how much of your time you spend at work, it makes sense to broaden that definition of self-care to include your […]

When you hear the phrase “self-care,” you might think of personal things like meditation, indulging in something decadent, yoga, a spa day, or taking time for a good book. But when you think about how much of your time you spend at work, it makes sense to broaden that definition of self-care to include your professional, hardworking self as well.

Here are 10 ways you can help expand your self care regimen into your workday.

1. Set boundaries

This can be one of the hardest things to do (gotta answer that 10 p.m. email!), but when work bleeds over into other aspects of your life, it can be a major source of stress. Start by setting no-work zones in your life, whether that’s not checking email on a Saturday, or turning off your phone by a certain time every evening.

2. Make your desk a zen space.

A clean, organized desk can reduce stress as well, and help put you in a good working headspace. Whether that means completely Kondo-ing your desk or simply deciding whether you need a ton of paper files instead of a digital archive, getting stuff out of your line of vision can help you feel more organized and on top of things.

3. Take walk breaks

Being deskbound can lead to all sorts of health issues, like back pain, weight gain, and plain old stress. If you can, schedule little breaks where you get up and walk around. If you can’t go outside, a loop around your office will do. Plus, you’ll have the extra incentive to be more social if you’re circulating.

4. Rethink your lunch hour

Your lunch hour doesn’t have to be just about lunch. Think of it as a “free period,” like back in school. Eating is key (hey, it’s in the name), but think about how to maximize your time. If your gym is nearby, consider a quick workout. Go out and grab a coffee. Find a quiet spot and meditate. Whatever helps you recharge for the afternoon, consider it part of your lunch routine.

5. Be a social butterfly

How many people do you work with that you’d consider a friend, not just an acquaintance who happens to be in the same place for 40 hours a week? Being more proactive about saying “hi” as you pass someone in the hall or waiting for coffee can help you make inroads with coworkers. It may seem like awkward chitchat at first, but making time to talk with people can help make your work relationships more fulfilling.

6. Be proactive about what you need

Feeling overwhelmed? Bored because you need more challenging work? Have a simmering conflict with a boss or coworker? If you want to make sure you’re taking care of yourself, it’s important to be proactive and attack issues as they come up. This is not to say you should be hyper-aggressive about everything that doesn’t feel like it’s going your way, but if you take an active approach to evaluating and fixing issues, it can boost your confidence, productivity, and general satisfaction levels at work.

7. Stay hydrated

This is a self-care strategy that works in every walk of life. And at work, it can be especially hard to remember to stay hydrated, since you may not be especially active while you’re working during the day. Investing in a water bottle and keeping it topped off throughout the day, can help you build good hydration practices instead of turning to coffee, soda, or other drinks that should be kept in moderation.

8. Go analog at least once a day

How much of your day is spent staring at a screen? Every day, set aside some time to do tasks that require you to look away from your computer and phone. Maybe it’s writing down a task list for the day. Maybe it’s jotting down notes ahead of a meeting to gather your thoughts. Our digital tools are very handy, but they also cause eye strain. It does your eyes and your brain good to get a break from screentime every once in a while. Your email will be waiting when you come back a few minutes later, don’t worry.

9. Dress the part

You know the old saying, “dress for the job you want”? I’d expand that to be dress for the work life you want. Wear things that make you feel confident and ready to go. Taking a little extra care with your outfit in the morning can help boost your mood throughout the day.

10. Set challenges for yourself

One of the most lethal threats to productivity is boredom. Regularly set realistic challenges for yourself. Try building a new professional skill that can help you later on with a promotion. Learn how a particular process at your company works that you’ve always been curious about. Set a goal of reading a certain number of industry-related articles per week. Whatever will keep you focused and engaged, add it to the list!

We spend so much of our time working. With the stresses and monotony of the work day, it’s easy to lose sight of the things that will make us happier. You have the power to make your work day smoother and more fulfilling, so it is definitely worth the effort.

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