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Iowa Sports

Iowa will cut four programs

By ERIC OLSON
AP Sports Writer
The University of Iowa will drop four sports programs as part of the athletic department’s response to a projected loss of $100 million in revenue due to the coronavirus pandemic.
School president Bruce Harreld and athletic director Gary Barta said Friday that men’s gymnastics, men’s tennis and men’s and women’s swimming and diving will be discontinued after the 2020-21 academic year.
A pair of local athletes will be affected by the changes. Fort Dodge Senior High graduates Andrew Fierke and Taylor Hartley — both juniors — are members of the men’s and women’s swimming programs, respectively. Fierke is a part of the Hawkeyes’ school record quartet in the 800 freestyle relay, and Hartley is an academic all-Big Ten selection.
Barta said the Big Ten’s decision to postpone football and other fall sports until the spring will create an overall budget deficit between $60 million and $75 million this year.
“A loss of this magnitude will take years to overcome. We have a plan to recover, but the journey will be challenging,” Harreld and Barta said.
Iowa is the second school in a Power Five conference to drop sports. Stanford announced last month that it would eliminate 11 sports. More than 200 sports programs have been cut across the NCAA’s three divisions and NAIA since March. The total is 73 in Division I and includes 11 men’s tennis teams.
Athletic departments across the country are facing financial hardships because of the cancellation of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament and shortened or canceled football seasons. The Big Ten and Pac-12 aren’t playing football this fall, and teams in the three other Power Five conferences are planning to play fewer games.
Iowa said its four programs targeted for elimination will compete in 2020-21 if circumstances surrounding COVID-19 permit. Existing scholarships will be honored through graduation for athletes who remain at Iowa. The contracts of affected coaches will be honored.
Among factors considered for which sports to cut were number of schools sponsoring teams at the Division I level, impact on gender equity and Title IX compliance, expense savings, history of the sport at Iowa and engagement level.
The school said it would not consider seeking private funds to sustain the sports.
The university announced budget cuts in July, including an initial $15 million reduction for athletics through pay cuts and furloughs.

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Iowa Sports

Iowan Johnson to receive Payne Stewart Award

By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
Zach Johnson had quick success after a long road to the PGA Tour. He won as a rookie and reached the Tour Championship in Atlanta, where one of the perks was attending a ceremony to watch Jay Haas accept the Payne Stewart Award.
He remembers it being powerful, inspiring, motivating.
It brought Johnson to tears 16 years later when he was selected Wednesday to receive the Payne Stewart Award.
“It makes everything I’ve done on and off the golf course worth it,” Johnson said. “It makes everything whole and complete.”
Few others got more out of their game than Johnson, who famously described himself as a “normal guy from Cedar Rapids, Iowa” when he won the Masters. His 12 victories on the PGA Tour include the 2015 British Open, making him one of only six players to win at Augusta National and St. Andrews.
The award began in 2000 after Stewart, a three-time major champion, perished in a freak plane accident on the way to the Tour Championship. As it enters its second decade, the award now is regarded as the most prestigious on the PGA Tour.
Byron Nelson, Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus shared the award the first year. Since then, past winners include Haas and Steve Stricker, Jim Furyk and Ernie Els, Davis Love III and Nick Price. It goes to the player who best exemplifies Stewart’s value of character, charity and sportsmanship.
Johnson, 44, is the first winner who has never met Stewart, which was bound to happen over time. Stewart died five years before Johnson’s rookie year. Even so, Stewart was one of his idols. For years, when asked for his dream foursome, Johnson mentioned his father, Ben Hogan and Stewart.
“I always liked his golf swing. In the most difficult of situations, his best game came out,” Johnson said. “I love how he changed his life. He was a prankster. He was a character. But he lived his faith, and I greatly admire that.”
Johnson met Stewart’s wife, Tracey, and children Chelsea and Aaron, before he made it to the PGA Tour. He was living in Orlando, Florida, and Johnson and his wife went to a Payne and Tracey Foundation event. Johnson later used the same financial advisers for his charity work.
But when he saw them most recently, there was momentary confusion.
Johnson was out of town at a family gathering when his agent told him he had two remote conferences on his schedule. Johnson figured it was about the Ryder Cup (he is an assistant captain). Johnson was trying to get logged on for the calls when his wife, Kim, came into the bedroom and said she needed a break.
Only later did he realize she was there to film him.
“I get on and it’s kind of fuzzy, and I can see smiles and I was like, ’I recognize him,” Johnson said of seeing Aaron Stewart. “And then I see Chelsea Stewart and thought, ‘Is she still with the PGA Tour?’”
Chelsea Stewart previously worked in a corporate marketing capacity at the tour. Then, he heard a voice say, “Tracey, can you hear us?”
And that’s when it hit him.
“I started crying,” Johnson said. “My wife recorded it. She knew it was a big deal. She knew how big of a deal it is to me. I love what the award represents. I love the fact the PGA Tour is honoring Payne and his legacy. … What it did for me was it highlighted the fact I’ve been around great people, whether it’s sponsors, my foundation board, the guys who started me (financially), my family. I’m so fortunate to be around good people.”
Johnson needed a group of investors just to keep alive his dream of playing golf when he graduated from Drake. He played mini-tours on any tour he could find, piling up mileage on a Dodge Intrepid. A good year meant he had money leftover to pay back his investors, which he did five out of six years traveling the country.
He made it to the Nationwide Tour and won the money list in 2003. A year later, he won the BellSouth Classic outside Atlanta, and in 2007 he became a major champion.
Now he returns to Atlanta for an award that means just as much.
PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan referred to Johnson as a “fearless underdog” and a statewide hero in Iowa for his charitable work in his home state.
“Zach would say he’s just a normal guy from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, but in truth, he has one of the most compelling stories on the PGA Tour in the last 25 years,” Monahan said.
Johnson will be honored Sept. 2 during the Tour Championship in Atlanta.

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Iowa Sports

Garza coming back to Iowa for senior year

IOWA CITY (AP) — Big Ten player of the year Luka Garza announced Sunday he is withdrawing from the NBA draft and will return to Iowa for his senior season.
“My heart is in Iowa City,” Garza said. “I love this place too much to leave it. I love my teammates, coaches, community, fans and university. It would have been way too hard to close the book without the last chapter.”
The 6-foot-11, 260-pound center from Washington, D.C., scored 20 or more points in the last 16 games of his junior season, the longest streak by an Iowa player since 1971. He led the Hawkeyes to 20 wins and a likely NCAA Tournament bid if it had not been for the coronavirus pandemic, which caused the tournament to be canceled.
Garza was a consensus first-team All-American and runner-up for Associated Press national player of the year.
“Luka’s decision is incredibly unselfish and heartwarming,” coach Fran McCaffery said. “Luka has an opportunity to advance himself professionally, but instead, he is thinking more about the program and his teammates. His goals are team-oriented. He has an incredible bond with his brothers in the locker room and believes in this group.”
Garza scored 25 points or more 13 times last season and had seven games with at least 25 points and 10 rebounds. His 15 double-doubles were the most by an Iowa player since 2002. His 23.9 points per game ranked fifth nationally, and his 26.2-point average in conference games was the highest since Purdue’s Glenn Robinson averaged 31.1 in 1994.
“He is willing to bet on himself, which shows tremendous confidence,” McCaffery said. “I am excited to be part of it and thrilled to have an opportunity to coach him again. There is no better feeling than having student-athletes here for the right reasons, who want to be great and do it in our program.”
With Garza’s announcement, Iowa returns seven players with significant starting experience.
“With the overall depth, length, and experience that we have returning I believe we have a group determined to make the most of this season,” Garza said.

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Iowa Sports

Ex-Hawk Wirfs will be ready if Bucs need him

By FRED GOODALL
AP Sports Writer
TAMPA, Fla. — Tristan Wirfs knows he has a critical role to play in helping Tom Brady transform the Tampa Bay Buccaneers into winners. The rookie is undaunted by the challenge of preparing for the task without the benefit of a normal preseason.
The former Iowa star was the 13th pick in this year’s NFL draft, addressing the need to bolster an offensive line responsible for protecting the team’s 43-year-old quarterback and opening holes for what has a chance to be an improved rushing attack.
Although Wirfs, 21, is expected to be an immediate starter at right tackle, he concedes he and other first-year players have a lot of ground to cover in training camp. They must get up to speed after not being able to participate in a full offseason program due to the coronavirus pandemic.
And with preseason games also eliminated, the Bucs won’t line up against anyone in opposing jerseys until the club’s scheduled regular-season opener at New Orleans on Sept. 13.
“We missed out on 400 or 500 live reps of plays, so just trying to make that up as best we can is going to be really huge for us,” Wirfs said, adding he’s not overly concerned about potentially being at a disadvantage entering his first season.
“I don’t really know how much different it’ll be for me coming from college. We didn’t really have preseason games. We just had camp and then started playing. They were non-conference, but still,” the 6-foot-5, 320-pound tackle said.
“This time around, I know we have some good pass rushers on the Bucs, so just getting some work in with them and doing the best I can,” Wirfs added. “If the case is that I’m going against (Saints defensive end) Cam Jordan, I’ll be excited and just give it my best.”
Tampa Bay traded up one spot in the draft to ensure an opportunity to select Wirfs, a dominant blocker in college who continued to impress at the NFL scouting combine. He had the fastest 40-yard dash time (4.85 seconds) among linemen and set a record for his position in the vertical jump (36¢ inches).
Bucs coach Bruce Arians said linemen probably are the players most affected by not having a normal offseason of work.
“I think both lines of scrimmage, the offensive line and defensive line not being able to work on pad level,” Arians said. “We’re going to have 14 days in pads. That is not a lot of time to get ready to play in a ballgame against really quality opponents, but we’re going to have to get it done.”
At Iowa, Wirfs became only the second true freshman to start a game at tackle under long-time Hawkeyes coach Kirk Ferentz. Now, he’s unfazed by the prospect of stepping right in with the Bucs, who’ve missed the playoffs 12 consecutive seasons — the second-longest drought in the NFL behind Cleveland, which hasn’t earned a berth since 2002.
“That’s kind of how my college career started. I was kind of just tossed in there. It happening this way, at this level, I’d be all right with it. I’ve just got to go out there and do my best – that’s all I can ask of myself,” Wirfs said.
“You’ve got to prepare every week and come out and execute. That’s really what it comes down to,” he added. “If that’s the case where I have to get tossed in there, then so be it. I’ll be as ready as I can be and give it my all.”

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Iowa Sports

No fall sports for Grinnell

GRINNELL (AP) — Grinnell College says it will cancel football and other fall sports because of concerns about the coronavirus.
The Division III school announced Monday it would cancel sports including football, soccer, golf, cross country and volleyball. The college, located in the small city of Grinnell about 45 miles east of Des Moines, competes in the Midwest Conference.
“We have approached every decision about the coming school year, including this one, using a public health framework that prioritizes the health and safety of our students, faculty, staff, and community,” the college said in a statement. “Based on the best currently available public health information, we have decided that while there will be athletics at Grinnell this year, we will not compete against other colleges during Fall Term 1.”
Grinnell officials said they would wait to decide whether to allow other sports later in the school year.
The decision comes less than a year after the college canceled much of its football season because its roster had dwindled to 28 players due to injuries. Grinnell had planned to resume football this year.

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Iowa Sports

Cardinals will face White Sox in Field of Dreams game

By RONALD BLUM
AP Baseball Writer
NEW YORK — The St. Louis Cardinals have replaced the New York Yankees as the opponent for the Chicago White Sox in the Field of Dreams game on Aug. 13 at Dyersville, Iowa.
The schedule change caused by the new coronavirus pandemic meant the White Sox no longer play the Yankees this season. The new opponent, first reported by The Des Moines Register, was confirmed to The Associated Press by a person familiar with the arrangements who spoke on condition of anonymity Wednesday because the matchup has not been announced.
Major League Baseball hopes to announce its new schedule next week. Each team will play 60 games, 40 against division rivals and 20 against teams in the corresponding regional division in the other league.
“We hope to have the option to play,” MLB said in a statement. “Construction is continuing and we are following all CDC and state protocols regarding recommended safety practices, including social distancing, washing hands, and temperature checks before arriving to the site.”
It remains unclear whether fans would be allowed at the game, which is to be televised nationally by Fox.
“We are monitoring ongoing events and plan to remain as flexible as these circumstances demand,” MLB said.
A temporary 8,000-seat stadium is nearing completion at the site, about 200 miles west of Chicago, adjacent to where the movie was filmed on a diamond in a cornfield. This would be the first major league game played in Iowa.
The movie, released in 1989, starred Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan, James Earl Jones, Burt Lancaster and Ray Liotta.

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Iowa Sports

Wadley chastises Iowa program

IOWA CITY (AP) — Former Iowa running back Akrum Wadley ripped the Hawkeyes on Monday, saying he was so mistreated by some coaches he now regrets playing there.
Wadley’s statement, posted on Facebook, mentioned coach Kirk Ferentz, his son, offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz, director of player development Broderick Binns and Chris Doyle, the former strength and conditioning coach for the Hawkeyes.
Wadley said Brian Ferentz on several occasions jokingly asked him if he was on his way to commit a robbery when Wadley was leaving with a team-issued wool hat that covered his face in the cold. He said his weight was also a constant issue and was used to belittle him.
“I was threatened by KirkFerentz that my meal card would be taken away and I will not eat nor be able to sit with my teammates during eating sessions,” Wadley wrote. “He did follow through on his threat.”
Wadley, a New Jersey native, piled up a combined 3,633 yards rushing and receiving and scored 35 touchdowns for Iowa.
“I felt like playing for Iowa Football was a living nightmare,” he wrote. “I never drank alcohol prior to going to college but based on my experience there it became the only thing I could rely on, it seems and was what I did to cope.”
More than three dozen former Iowa players, most of them Black, have accused Iowa of racial bias within the program and many singled out Doyle, who left the university and will be paid $1.1 million. Iowa hired a law firm to conduct a review of the football program. Kirk Ferentz has held news conferences and promised to listen to his former players; Binns, a former player, has been named interim director of diversity and inclusion for the athletic department.
A statement issued Monday to the Des Moines Register said Kirk Ferentz would not comment publicly.
“Coach Ferentz believes that meaningful change takes time and a thorough independent examination is already underway,” the statement said. “He remains committed to creating a more inclusive culture for all of his players now and in the years to come.”
Ferentz is Iowa’s career wins leader and enters his 22nd season as the longest-tenured coach of a Bowl Subdivision program. Ferentz earned $5.5 million last year after bonuses, and his contract runs through the 2025 season.

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Iowa Sports

Barta backs Ferentz; Doyle done at Iowa

IOWA CITY (AP) — Iowa athletic director Gary Barta gave a vote of confidence to longtime football coach Kirk Ferentz on Monday after deciding to cut ties with a strength coach accused of mistreating African American players.
Ferentz has dealt seriously in addressing former and current players’ concerns about the program’s culture, Barta said. He also pointed to Ferentz’s on-field success, player development and the team’s record of community service.
“I do remain confident Kirk Ferentz can lead this team moving forward and many of the attributes we’re all familiar with over the last 20 years … are still there and still a part of the foundation and who Kirk is,” Barta said at a news conference.
Iowa announced a separattion agreement with Chris Doyle, at the center of allegations he and other assistant coaches made racist comments and belittled players. Doyle will be paid more than $1.1 million by the university, which also said a Missouri law firm, Husch Blackwell, will conduct an independent review of the allegations against the football program.
“I have worked diligently to make a positive impact on the lives of student-athletes, support them as they speak out, and look forward to continued growth,” Doyle said in a prepared statement. “I am confident that my record and character will be confirmed in the course of the independent review. The university and I have reached an agreement and it is time to move on from Iowa football. My family and I are looking forward to the next chapter.”
Doyle, who earned $800,000 per year and was the highest paid strength and conditioning coach in college football, has denied any “unethical behavior or bias” based on race. Under the agreement, Doyle will be paid 15 months’ salary and for unused vacation. There will be two payments of $556,249.50 — the first on Aug. 1 and the second on Jan. 1. Doyle agreed not to take any legal action against the university, the board of regents or state of Iowa.
Ferentz is Iowa’s all-time wins leader and enters his 22nd season as the longest-tenured coach of a Football Bowl Subdivision program. Ferentz earned $5.5 million last year after bonuses, and his contract runs through the 2025 season.
Barta became emotional during the news conference, choking up on two occasions he mentioned race relations in his athletic department and in the United States.
“One thing I wanted to do, and it’s really important to me, is to say I’m sorry to former student-athletes, coaches, staff, current student-athletes, anybody who has had a negative experience with Iowa football,” Barta said. “When I say negative — if you felt mistreated, misled, discriminated against, whatever the case, I truly am sorry. We want everybody who participates in our program to have a great experience academically, athletically and socially.”
Former Iowa offensive lineman James Daniels, now with the Chicago Bears, was the first to raise the issue of the Iowa staff’s treatment of players.
“There are too many racial disparities in the Iowa football program. Black players have been treated unfairly for far too long,” Daniels tweeted June 5.
Dozens of former players followed with social media posts about their experiences, especially with Doyle. He was placed on paid leave June 6. Offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz, son of the head coach, and assistant defensive coordinator Seth Wallace also have been alleged to have made inappropriate comments to players.
Kirk Ferentz said Friday the coaching style by some of his assistants “at times was demeaning and created unnecessary frustration and anxiety.”
Barta said Iowa’s efforts to address racial issues started two years ago when a review showed black male athletes were graduating at a rate lower than that of their white peers.
A diversity task force was created to explore reasons for the disparity, and a report indicated many black athletes felt uncomfortable. Barta said anonymous interviews produced comments such as “I felt like I had to put a mask on and check my identity at the door” and “I was told by my coach to change my hairstyle because it didn’t fit the Iowa culture.”
Barta noted steps that were taken in response. Former football player Broderick Binns was named interim director of diversity, equity and inclusion for the athletic department. Ferentz began having a regular dialogue with black athletes about their concerns. A consulting group was brought in to counsel black athletes about where they could turn if they don’t think their concerns were adequately addressed.
“I had convinced myself we were doing enough,” Barta said. “Frankly, the last few weeks have been a wakeup call.”

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Iowa Sports

Turning point for Iowa football program?

IOWA CITY (AP) — The Iowa football team took a big step toward improving its lines of communication in the week since the program was hit with allegations of systemic racism, coach Kirk Ferentz and three of his players said Friday.
Players returned to campus to begin voluntary workouts and spent two days with coaches voicing concerns about the program’s culture.
“The players did most of the talking,” Ferentz said. “It was raw. It was powerful. And it was productive. Everything was on the table. It got somewhat heated and somewhat emotional at times, and I think that’s good. That Monday meeting was about as an emotional and powerful meeting as I’ve ever seen.”
African American players Kaevon Merriweather and Ivory Kelly-Martin along with Keith Duncan, who is white, appeared with Ferentz at a news conference. All said progress was made this week.
“Everybody got what they wanted off their chest,” Merriweather said.
Kelly-Martin said, “We all have a lot of hope in our hearts this program is going to be able to change for the better and we’ll be able to show you guys that real soon.”
Former Iowa offensive lineman James Daniels, now with the Chicago Bears, was the first to raise the issue of the Iowa staff’s treatment of players.
“There are too many racial disparities in the Iowa football program. Black players have been treated unfairly for far too long,” Daniels tweeted last Friday.
Dozens of former players followed with social media posts about their experiences, with many accusing longtime strength coach Chris Doyle of making racist remarks and belittling players. Doyle was placed on paid administrative leave last Saturday, and Ferentz declined to comment on his status, citing a university investigation.
“There were serious and troubling comments by former players … and it comes during an important time during our nation’s history with what happened with George Floyd and the worldwide reaction to his death,” Ferentz said. “It’s given us all a better and deeper understanding of what racism and bias is and I think it’s begun an initiative for real change. As a team and program we have a responsibility and a tremendous opportunity at this moment to lead the change and set a higher standard for collegiate football.”
Ferentz announced 21 current players were named to the team’s 2020 Leadership Group. The nine seniors, three juniors, six sophomores and three redshirt freshmen will assist in formulating team policies and also be involved in team decision-making. A committee of former players led by Mike Daniels also will offer input on building a positive atmosphere.
Ferentz said he spent a lot of time talking with former players after James Daniels’ initial tweet. Ferentz said many expressed appreciation for the help they received achieving academic and athletic goals, but he also was told of mistreatment by Doyle and other assistant coaches.
“The coaching style by some at times was demeaning and created unnecessary frustration and anxiety,” Ferentz said. “One byproduct of that is that some of our black athletes feeling they couldn’t be themselves in our culture, and to that end we must be more inclusive and more aware.”
Former Iowa linebacker Terrance Pryor said Doyle had told him he should take up rowing, then added, “Oh, wait, black people don’t like boats in water, do they?” Former safety Diaunte Morrow alleged Doyle had told him he would send him “back to the ghetto.” Former defensive back Emmanuel Rugamba told of Doyle admonishing a black teammate and then asked him why he walked with swagger. “I’ll put you back on the streets,” Doyle told the teammate, according to Rugamba.
Doyle, who earns $800,000 a year and is the highest paid strength coach in college football, issued a statement denying any “unethical behavior or bias” based on race.
Offensive coordinator Brian Ferentz, Kirk’s son, also was alleged to have made insensitive comments. Kirk Ferentz did not directly address his son’s behavior.
The 22nd-year coach acknowledged he had a “blind spot” about the way players felt about their treatment until James Daniels’ tweet.
“I can’t do anything about what’s happened,” he said. “What I can do is try to do a better job moving forward.”

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Iowa Sports

Wirfs taken 13th by Tampa Bay

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — The Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected offensive tackle Tristan Wirfs with the 13th pick in the NFL draft on Thursday night, trading up one spot in the selection order to ensure they secured more protection for recently acquired quarterback Tom Brady.
Bolstering the offensive line was the team’s top priority after signing the six-time Super Bowl champion in free agency, trading for four-time All-Pro tight end Rob Gronkowski and spending generously to retain some key components of a defense that made strides the latter part of last season.
With several tackles — Georgia’s Andrew Thomas, Alabama’s Jedrick Wills and Louisville’s Mekhi Becton —off the board, the Bucs swung a deal with the San Francisco 49ers to move up one spot from No. 14 to take Wirfs.
The former Iowa star was rated among the top offensive lineman available in the draft and will be given an opportunity to fill an opening at right tackle created by the departure of long-time starter Demar Dotson, who was not re-signed after being a fixture in Tampa Bay’s lineup since 2012.
Jameis Winston led the NFL in passing yards and threw for 33 touchdowns in 2019, however he also tossed 30 interceptions and was sacked 47 times as the Bucs finished 7-9 and missed the playoffs for the 12th consecutive season.
Brady recentlys signed a two-year, $50 million contract.
For all the uniqueness of this NFL draft, including the angst over a potential communications fiasco, things looked and sounded pretty normal Thursday night.
Quarterbacks were in demand. Ohio State and the Southeastern Conference dominated. The Patriots traded out of the first round.
And Commissioner Roger Goodell even got booed, if only digitally.
“I do believe this draft is going to be the most memorable we have ever had,” said Goodell, noting that it is accompanied by a “Draft-A-Thon” to benefit six organizations on the front lines battling the coronavirus pandemic, which is what forced the NFL to cancel all in-person draft events.
The first round wasn’t all that remarkable for the picks. Beginning with Joe Burrow of national champion LSU, three quarterbacks went in the top six. Hardly unusual.
For months, the Heisman Trophy winner from LSU was linked with the Bengals. Cincinnati began the draft by sending his name to Goodell in the basement of his home.
The NFL canceled all draft activities in Las Vegas when the national shutdown of large gatherings began.
The second overall selection, Ohio State All-America edge rusher Chase Young, also was predictable. Washington fielded several offers for that spot, but many scouts and personnel executives felt Young was the best player in this crop.
At 6-foot-5, 264 pounds, Young led the nation with 16 1/2 sacks and forced fumbles with six last season.
The All-American won the prestigious Bednarik and Nagurski awards in 2019, leading the Buckeyes to the Big Ten title.
He joins a Redskins team that went 3-13 and allowed 435 points.
If not for the NFL’s obsession with finding the latest, greatest quarterback prospect, Young might have been the top overall selection. That QB infatuation led Miami to Tua Tagovailoa and the Los Angeles Chargers to Justin Herbert — no surprises there. But Green Bay took a chance at No. 26 by taking Utah State QB Jordan Love.
Alabama’s Tagovailoa went fifth, followed in the next spot by Oregon’s Herbert. They were preceded by Ohio State’s Jeff Okudah, the highest-rated cornerback, to Detroit, and Georgia tackle Andrew Thomas to the Giants.
Tagovailoa’s health issues didn’t turn off the Dolphins.