Sailor killed in 1941 at Pearl Harbor to be buried in Dallas

DALLAS (AP) — A 26-year-old Texas sailor killed during the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor will be buried in Dallas on the 77th anniversary of the attack.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency on Thursday announced services for Navy Fireman 1st Class Albert U. Kane of Fort Worth will be held Dec. 7. Burial is planned at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery.

Kane, on Dec. 7, 1941, was assigned to the USS Oklahoma when the battleship was attacked. His unidentified remains were among those buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. A number of remains, associated with the USS Oklahoma, were ordered disinterred in 2015 for DNA testing.

Kane’s remains were accounted for Aug. 9.

The federal agency says Kane’s family has asked not to be contacted by the media.

 

Cordeiro leads huge comeback, Rainbow Warriors beat Rebels

UH snaps four-game losing streak, becomes bowl eligible with 35-28 win

HONOLULU (AP) — Freshman Chevan Cordeiro came on in the fourth quarter and threw three touchdown passes to help the University of Hawaii football team beat UNLV 35-28 on Saturday night at Aloha Stadium.

With the win, the Rainbow Warriors snapped a four-game losing streak and became bowl eligible.

Cordeiro, a true freshman out of Saint Louis School, replaced starter Cole McDonald and, on the first play, threw a 64-yard touchdown pass to JoJo Ward and then hit John Ursua for the 2-point conversion to trim UH’s deficit to 28-21 with 11:42 to play.

On UNLV’s ensuing drive, Lexington Thomas was dropped for a 2-yard loss by Penei Pavihi on fourth-and-2 and the Rainbow Warriors gained possession near midfield. Cordeiro ran for a 17-yard gain on third-and-9 and two plays later, on third-and-5, connected with Ward for a 20-yard TD to tie it with 4:23 left.

Pavihi sacked Armani Rogers for a 3-yard loss on third-and-8 before Cordeiro hit Ursua in stride on the right sideline for a 68-yard touchdown less than three minutes later.

Thomas finished with 28 carries for 129 yards and two touchdowns for UNLV (3-8, 1-6 Mountain West).

Cordeiro was 4-of-5 passing for 153 yards. Hawaii (7-5, 4-3), which is headed to a bowl game for the second time in three years under head coach Nick Rolovich, had 190 of its 411 total yards in the fourth quarter.

The Rainbow Warriors close the regular season at San Diego State next week, and then likely will play in the Hawaii Bowl on Dec. 22 at Aloha Stadium.

6 polite and professional ways to call out a lazy coworker

It’s not your job to motivate or police your coworkers. If it were, you would be their boss. But if you have a lazy coworker it can be a drag on your department or a team project—and in large and small ways, a coworker’s laziness can grate on you and affect your work life for […]

It’s not your job to motivate or police your coworkers. If it were, you would be their boss. But if you have a lazy coworker it can be a drag on your department or a team project—and in large and small ways, a coworker’s laziness can grate on you and affect your work life for the worse. Mix in a sense of unfairness about what some coworkers get away with, and you have a recipe for frustration and job dissatisfaction.

But you don’t just have to throw up your hands and despair—there are a few ways to make sure someone else’s laziness doesn’t create a dysfunctional work day for you.

1. Be direct

The worst thing to do would be to engage in passive-aggressive behaviors—jokes, subtle hints, and sarcasm rarely land the way you want them to and your message may not be taken seriously or received at all. Make it easy on yourself: sum up the problem and how it affects you in one sentence and ask to have a short conversation with your coworker. You don’t need to agonize over a carefully worded email. Don’t be too confrontational or accusatory; just keep it simple, like: Could you pay more attention to this? When you don’t, I have more work to do. Sometimes laziness continues precisely because no one points it out. The simple antidote? Be direct.

2. Be quick

Never call out a coworker when you are truly annoyed, because that will surely lead to unprofessional behavior. On the other hand, it’s best to address an issue soon after it happens, so your coworker is clear on a specific time they were engaging in lazy behavior, and they don’t perceive you as nursing a weird grudge. Waiting too long after the fact can make it seem like you’ve been stewing for days—and rehashing the past can add another toxic element to the mix, causing your coworker to become defensive. Again, be direct, and point out something concrete that will make things better, and help your coworker snap out of their lazy habits.

3. Ask a favor

If either of the first two options seem too confrontational, you can directly ask your coworker for help on a project. It’s easy for some to ignore a task; it’s much harder to ignore a human being asking for help. This puts the lazy coworker in an awkward position: either they have to take the strong stance of saying “No,” or simply help. Just something to keep in mind—a lazy person is not necessarily a discourteous person, but the favor will pit their laziness against their sense of decency to their coworkers.

4. Set up check-in meetings

A deadline can be a great taskmaster for the go-getter. Why not try this out for the lazy? A check-in meeting where each coworker sums up their progress on a project creates a certain level of accountability. The lazy coworker will be lagging behind, have nothing to report, and it will be obvious to everyone in the room. In essence, the lazy coworker will call themselves out, and the burden won’t be on you.

5. Suggest a better workflow to your supervisor

This doesn’t mean rat someone out or complain about their laziness to a supervisor, because that may not appear professional either. This option acknowledges that it’s not your job to pick up the slack for coworkers, nor is it your job to get them to do their work. If you see a better way to divide and conquer a task and you suggest it, this shows you are taking initiative and can help change the dynamic of how your team or department works together.

6. Form a bond

Sometimes the only real thing you can change about your work situation is how you react and feel about it. If your frustration over your coworker’s laziness has reached the boiling point, take it down a notch. You don’t know what personal life issues your coworker may be facing. Be friendly. Bond with your coworker and try to reach a better understanding of them on a personal level. This can help reduce your frustration and make it easier if you ever do need to call them out on their behavior in the future.

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How to handle anxiety and stress in the workplace 

The world of work offers many challenges. We get to learn more about our passions and interests, as well as our strengths and areas for improvement, and it gives us opportunities to mature as we take on new responsibilities, gain professional satisfaction, and chart a course for our lifelong career journeys—all key factors in leading […]

The world of work offers many challenges. We get to learn more about our passions and interests, as well as our strengths and areas for improvement, and it gives us opportunities to mature as we take on new responsibilities, gain professional satisfaction, and chart a course for our lifelong career journeys—all key factors in leading a happy and fulfilling life.

However—there’s a flipside to the work coin, which includes the reality that work is not always fun and easy. In fact, for most of us, our work lives can be a serious and persistent source of anxiety and stress, and it’s no small matter: It can affect all facets of our lives—not just our time spent at work—and can have lasting effects on our physical and mental well-being.

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) recently conducted a survey regarding workplace stress and anxiety. Among their key findings:

  • Employees say stress and anxiety most often impacts their workplace performance (56 percent), relationship with coworkers and peers (51 percent), quality of work (50 percent), and relationships with superiors (43 percent).
  • More than three-fourths who say stress interferes with their work say it carries over to their personal life, particularly men (83 percent vs. 72 percent for women).
  • 7 in 10 adults report that workplace stress affects their personal relationships, mainly with their spouses. Men (79 percent) report it affecting personal relationships more than women (61 percent).
  • The main culprits of work-related stress are deadlines (55 percent), interpersonal relationships (53 percent), staff management (50 percent), and dealing with issues/problems that arise (49 percent).

Does this sound familiar? If so, and you’re experiencing anxiety and stress resulting from work, you’re not alone—and you don’t have to suffer through it with no end in sight.

Be honest about it

When some of us feel the weight of workplace stress and anxiety, our first impulse may be to write it off as something else. We analyze the symptoms—everything from lethargy to sleeplessness to irritability and changes in mood and behavior—and make excuses. We say that we’re just tired, or we’re just feeling sick, or even that it’s due to the weather. Basically, we do anything but acknowledge that our stress has a direct and obvious source—our jobs. We also try to rationalize that it’s only temporary, and that things will get better after this project or this “busy period,” even though it often never does. The truth is, these attempts to rationalize and “explain away” our work stress and anxiety only serves one purpose—to prolong it and avoid confronting it. The first step in handling workplace anxiety and stress is to be honest about it. This empowering move will help you begin to deal with it effectively.

Diagnose the problem(s)

Workplace stress and anxiety is similar to other problems in life in that you need to fully understand the issues contributing to the situation before you can turn the tide and overcome it. When you’re feeling the effects of work stress and anxiety, take a step back from things and give yourself the time to fully understand each and every individual source and symptom that is affecting your life. Often, a “one size fits all” solution to your workplace anxiety is ineffective when there are multiple sources at play. Once you see all of the sources clearly, you can start thinking about effective individual solutions for each. Often, just understanding the problems can alleviate some of the strain and propel you on the path to improvement.

Get help

Like other issues involving our jobs, we’re rarely completely alone in having to deal with stress and anxiety. Help is available—whether or not you choose to ask for it and accept it is your call. Depending on the issues that are contributing to your stress and anxiety and your specific workplace dynamic, you may benefit from taking the direct approach—be open with colleagues or bosses regarding the issues in an attempt to come up with effective solutions. Also, don’t forget that friends, family, and peers can be great sources of help and guidance here—especially if they’ve gone through similar situations. Also, don’t count out seeking the help of a professional. Many workplaces offer help through counseling and guidance services (both in-house and/or outside), and you always have the option of hiring a professional for help, the cost of which may be covered by your insurance plan. The bottom line is that you’re not alone here, and seeking help to deal with difficult issues isn’t shameful or embarrassing—it’s smart strategic thinking!

Find outlets

While there are times we can effectively tackle and reduce our workplace stress and anxiety by confronting it head-on, the truth is, sometimes it isn’t quite so easy. Simply put, some of us just have to accept that it’s a facet of our jobs. However, what we do have control over is how we spend our time outside of work, and making time for activities that help us offset the negative impact of our work is always a good idea. Get involved in things you enjoy doing in an effort to alleviate workplace stress and anxiety—finding a fulfilling life outside of work is very often the key to finding happiness within it.

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How to bond with your employees without compromising your authority 

Authority and power are complex issues that come with the task of being a manager. In the workplace, the ability to hire, fire, and give raises sets the power dynamic between employees and bosses. But while power and authority are clearly linked, authority is a bit murkier to define—it relies on the established relationship between […]

Authority and power are complex issues that come with the task of being a manager. In the workplace, the ability to hire, fire, and give raises sets the power dynamic between employees and bosses. But while power and authority are clearly linked, authority is a bit murkier to define—it relies on the established relationship between employees and their bosses and can be built over years and lost in an instant. Bonding with your employees and projecting authority are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the two things are much closer than one might think.

Here are a few ways you might develop both leadership traits.

Establish an atmosphere of mutual respect

Authority doesn’t come automatically with a job title. It is earned when managers are clearly knowledgeable and competent, and when they get results. But you can’t get those results without team effort—and your interaction with employees plays a vital role in establishing authority. In order to truly lead a team, you need to earn trust and establish an atmosphere of mutual respect with employees. If you find yourself pounding on your desk and engaging in intimidation tactics, chances are you are trying to assert authority rather than earn it. But if you build a base of shared respect, then bonding with employees will grow your authority rather than diminish it.

Take an interest in your employees

You don’t want to invite daily gab sessions or become a shoulder to cry on, but being responsive to employees and really listening can help foster your authority. Simple things like knowing where your employees went to college, or the names of their family members, or their personal interests and hobbies, can help you understand their motivations and actions at work and help establish basic respect. This type of bonding also fosters a working relationship that can open the channels of communication so that when your employees have a good idea, they can reach out. This way you can be the boss employees want to listen to and will trust to follow.

Be a real person

So, can you drink a beer with your employees and just be a regular person? Sure. But you can’t drink too much or share too much personal information. Letting employees see that you’re a real person with your own life and interests outside of work does not compromise your authority, but is part of that two-way street of building mutual respect. Social settings like the office party can help you bond while keeping it professional.

Set boundaries

After you relax with employees at an office party or talk up your golf game, you need to be clear when it’s time to focus back on work. The afternoon progress meeting is not the place to shoot the breeze, so take care to establish the atmosphere you want with a simple, firm-yet-kind acknowledgment of when it’s time to get back to business.

Head off problem employees

Occasionally there will be the employee who can’t separate the friendly boss from the friend and switch gears back to work-mode. If you find an employee becoming overly familiar, too joking, or disrespectful, this is where your authority needs to put its foot down. Nipping a problem in the bud is best, and opening the channels of communication with the individual employee can turn the situation around.

Bonding with your employees, when done the right way, can actually help you gain authority. It can take years to cultivate but largely stems from you setting appropriate boundaries and maintaining genuine interest in your employees as people. So ask yourself: are you approachable, or intimidating? And which do you think will get better results?

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Real Talk: Is grad school worth it?

It comes with a high price tag and time commitment, but lots of jobs seem to want a degree beyond a bachelor’s or associate’s. So, is grad school worth it? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the simple answer is yes. Those with doctoral degrees, professional degrees, or master’s degrees have higher median usual […]

It comes with a high price tag and time commitment, but lots of jobs seem to want a degree beyond a bachelor’s or associate’s. So, is grad school worth it?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the simple answer is yes. Those with doctoral degrees, professional degrees, or master’s degrees have higher median usual weekly earnings and lower unemployment rates. While there are counterpoints to this idea (like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, or Oprah, who made their wild successes without obtaining any degrees in higher education) and data showing that an electrician or plumbing apprenticeship may be a better investment than either a B.A. or a Ph.D., generally speaking the higher degree of learning you have, the higher your weekly income.

But this is all in the abstract—and your real-life situation may not appear so simple as a bar chart. What about the tuition costs, the investment of your time and effort, the job opportunities and earning years you give up in the meantime, and the possibility that it might not work out the way you want?

The question most people need to ask first is: can I afford the short-term pain for the potential long-term gain? There are also differences in every industry and every degree program—some, like a medical degree, will get you a monetary return on investment sooner than an MFA in painting. Earnings vary by industry, demographics, and location, and of course by individual, and a graduate degree does not automatically line your pockets with more cash each week. (In the short-term, it will do the exact opposite.) Degrees also gain and lose earning potential over time; going to law school was a much better bet in the year 2000, before natural learning search algorithms eliminated much of the entry-level work, than it is today. You may also consider other factors like the value the graduate degree has beyond earning potential.

But no matter what type of degree you seek, it is work and it is a gamble. So here are a few factors to consider before you fill out your FAFSA and brush up on your math skills for the GRE.

If you are currently employed and the company will pay for it:

Take advantage of professional advancement programs within your current job. If your employer helps pay for grad school and you can juggle courses and your day job, then go for it. This helps take care of one of the main drawbacks of graduate school: going broke. Depending on the degree program, universities might even offer stipends and assistantships.

Getting funding assistance of any kind is one of the key bonuses that can help you get that degree to take you further in your professional endeavors. And, if you can remain gainfully employed while seeking a degree, your personal risk is considerably diminished. At the very least, you won’t need to find a new job if the degree program does not pan out.

If you consider your qualifications for future positions:

For some positions, you simply need a graduate degree. Librarian? Yes. Architect? Yes. Doctor? Yes. If the dream job you always see posted on your favorite job website requires a graduate degree, then it’s time to seriously consider investing in that future to make the dream achievable. The trickiness of the situation comes when you make yourself overqualified for other positions. For example, if you have a graduate degree in marketing, but have no job experience, you may be screened out of the applicant pool for entry-level jobs. In cases like this, it is vital to explore internship opportunities while in school and cultivate real-world work experience too.

If the degree has value beyond earning potential:

If you simply have a love of learning or a passion you want to follow, is it worth it? This is the case where “worth” may be defined beyond the monetary value. This means you will enjoy grad school with its challenges, but you may set yourself back monetarily for a few years. If you want a degree in art history, there’s no guarantee you will ever get a job as a museum conservator. You may still end up with a sales job and a vast knowledge of 16th century painters in your head.

Beyond personal enrichment, there are other types of value for a graduate degree—for example, if the program offers good connections and internships. This can help with careers that are harder to break into like television, acting, or journalism.

If you consider the money now vs. money in the future:

Degrees with more immediate pipelines to job opportunities (like nursing, law school, or an MBA program) tend to charge tuition; artist’s MFA degrees or a PhD in academic subjects that are less market-oriented tend to offer tuition remission, stipends, assistantships or on-campus jobs. (If they don’t, then it’s much less worth it; don’t go into debt for a nonprofessional graduate degree!) If you’re not in a professional degree program, the lean years may extend a bit longer beyond grad school, and you may only gain success years later as you work towards your goal around your day job.

If you are considering using the degree to teach at the college level:

The job market for professors has stagnated over the last decade, with a severe glut of degree holders and a dearth of jobs teaching full-time in university departments. Increasingly those earning a PhD in programs of study that can last 5-10 years are seeking out “alt-ac” jobs—meaning nonacademic jobs—or spending years doing low-wage, low-security teaching work before leaving the profession. Do the research on your field and its job prospects before you commit to spending so many of your prime earning years in graduate school for a teaching career that might never materialize, no matter how smart you are or hard you try.

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How to communicate with students through technology

Your students are on devices all day long, constantly texting, scrolling through social media, and checking email between classes (and sometimes during class). While many schools have technology policies and some teachers ban devices in their classroom, some are embracing tech to reach this generation in key ways: as teaching tools within the classroom, through […]

Your students are on devices all day long, constantly texting, scrolling through social media, and checking email between classes (and sometimes during class). While many schools have technology policies and some teachers ban devices in their classroom, some are embracing tech to reach this generation in key ways: as teaching tools within the classroom, through multimodal assignments, and through communication beyond the classroom.

Tech is increasingly being used in the classroom as a learning tool—even as the assignment itself. Your students are learning how to build personal websites and sophisticated presentations using software like Google Slides, Prezi, or Canva; students today are increasingly more likely to upload a file rather than print an assignment on paper.

Consequently, teachers writing notes on the margins of an assignment in red ink is becoming a thing of the past. Whether it’s a way to reach the eyes that are overly invested in their screens or simply to find the most functional way to give feedback on various types of media, there are several ways to use tech as a communication tool in and beyond the classroom.

But first let’s be clear about what not to do: no texting students or communicating via social media apps. Although you want to reach students, communicating with tech they primarily use with friends or family muddies the effectiveness of your messaging, and potentially communicates a lack of seriousness to some students. It also interferes with your own ability to set proper boundaries between you and your students, as well as between your work life and your home life. It’s not about being the cool techy teacher. It’s about finding tools that suit your needs and meeting your students where they are.

Go Paperless

The paperless classroom can be a way to not only stop the spread of germs, but also make turning in an assignment as easy as clicking a button. Wouldn’t it also be great to give students feedback just as easily? Using the comments features on Microsoft Word or platforms like Google Docs can be great for providing feedback to students who can reexamine the assignment in the same way they created it: on screen.

This isn’t just about convenience; electronic feedback lets you make changes directly to their document, allowing them to get a sense of what the finished revision would look like without the need to decode your handwriting. Google Docs can also be a great way to communicate to students engaged in group work and allow easy communication among multiple users.

Going paperless can be more easily facilitated when your school uses LMS (Learning Management Systems) like Canvas or D2L, but there are a number of Google products like Google Sites that can allow teachers seeking out a user-friendly platform to provide online syllabi, updates, and assignments that students can access quickly.

Voice & Video

We so often gear the classroom towards reaching auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learners to reinforce the multiple ways students receive messages, but some teachers rarely mix it up in their feedback—which is often written. Providing feedback on documents using voice annotations features that exist in programs like Microsoft Word or creating voiceovers on video-recorded presentations with programs like Screenflow can be a great way to reach students who are auditory learners. It’s also a way to engage students who get to hear the real voice of the teacher and read impressions and detect enthusiasm that can get lost in written feedback.

The great thing about tech is that it allows more types of communication and creative ways to engage students—but it also is a two-way street. Various apps that allow you or your students to develop video with some flair like Filmora or Animoto can be a dynamic way to engage class material for everyone.

Interactive Tech

In the classroom, communicating course content can be made more interactive by creating lessons where technology use is required through platforms like Blendspace (which can incorporate a YouTube video, Power Points, images and documents). You can engage students with interactive games like Kahoot—a quick multiple-choice quiz game the entire class plays on their phones or computer. Or you can engage student feedback through interactive polls like Poll Everywhere or Micropoll.

By inviting students specifically to use the devices they are so familiar with, you can help facilitate the learning process and get your students excited to learn.

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How to get your financial life in order before the new year

Are you finally ready to get your financial health in better shape? If so, then you’re thinking wisely, because it’s never too soon to start taking your relationship with money more seriously and plan for your future—like it or not, it’s going to come eventually, and those who prepare for it in advance will be […]

Are you finally ready to get your financial health in better shape? If so, then you’re thinking wisely, because it’s never too soon to start taking your relationship with money more seriously and plan for your future—like it or not, it’s going to come eventually, and those who prepare for it in advance will be ready to face it responsibly and with as little anxiety as possible.

For most of us, the future can be an uncertain entity—what our professional and personal lives will look like as the months, years, and decades roll forward can be difficult to predict, and unexpected twists and turns along the way can derail our plans and force us to revise our goals along the way. This uncertainly can cause a great deal of stress, so it makes sense to have as much under our control and working in our favor as possible. Having a financial safety net of sorts to help see us through is obviously beneficial.

Have we convinced you that it’s a good idea to start getting your financial life in order? If so, then keep reading, and consider using the following strategies to get you started on the right path.

Get serious

One of the most important aspects of getting yourself in good financial shape is to get in the proper mindset for doing so. Like most endeavors in life that require a change in behavior and extended displays of discipline, being in the right mental space at the onset, during the critical first steps, is an essential ingredient for success.

So, in order to get started with the right attitude and mindset, try making a list of goals for getting your life in financial order. Both short- and long-term goals are fair game here. Do you want to pay back a loan or reduce your debt? Do you want to make a significant purchase sometime in the future that you want to be in better financial shape for, like a car or home? Are you preparing for a major life change, like a move or starting a family? Having a set of tangible (and achievable!) goals on your radar can help you get in the right mindset for making smart financial decisions—both now and over the long haul. The truth is, sometimes it takes having a destination in your sights to make it through a long journey.

Start small

For most of us, we can’t simply buy our way to financial freedom—it’s more of a long, hard road than a quick sprint, and it’s a journey that often never has a definitive end. So, think of your initial move to get your financial life in order as a series of small steps in the right direction. Even if they don’t completely change your life in an instant, they’ll get you moving in the right direction and will help you develop fiscally responsible behaviors, build on your positive inertia, and bolster your mindset and discipline.

Think of some small ways you can get started—perhaps save a little bit of money each week from each paycheck or find a few ways you can earn some extra money (a part-time job or selling some of your unwanted stuff are great ideas). You can also try eliminating some unnecessary expenses in your life. Don’t look back—like any great journey, getting on the road to financial order begins with a single step.

Get help

One of the really nice things about getting your financial life in order these days is that there are more tools than ever before to help you stay on track. An army of app developers have devoted their efforts to creating financial planning, organizing, and saving tools that can help you get your finances in order and hit all of your money milestones along your path to financial freedom. A little Internet research to discover the latest and greatest apps that best meet your needs is time well spent. Many available apps are free or low cost, so testing some out and discovering the ones that work well for you through trial and error won’t be a monumental investment.

You can also turn to friends and family for help—the truth is, having the important people in our lives helping to keep us motivated can mean the difference between success and failure in a challenging situation. So, let your friends and family know about your financial plans, fill them in on how they can help, and use their support to achieve your goals.

Getting your life in financial order may not be easy, and you may stumble and restart at times along the way, but it’s a journey worth taking, and one that’s best to start early. Use the advice and strategies presented here to help get you moving in the right direction when it comes to your money and finances.

The post How to get your financial life in order before the new year appeared first on TheJobNetwork.

How to communicate honestly with your boss

Those of us who have spent any time in the workforce—from newcomers to seasoned veterans and across all industries and positions—have learned the value and importance of maintaining a positive and effective working relationship with our bosses. It just makes good intuitive sense—for most of us, our bosses are the professional gatekeepers, and we need […]

Those of us who have spent any time in the workforce—from newcomers to seasoned veterans and across all industries and positions—have learned the value and importance of maintaining a positive and effective working relationship with our bosses. It just makes good intuitive sense—for most of us, our bosses are the professional gatekeepers, and we need to do our best to keep things going well with them if we want them to open the doors to promotions, new opportunities, greater responsibility, and more money. Like it or not, your relationship with your boss should be one you take seriously and put in the effort to cultivate.

In any healthy relationship, honesty is the cornerstone—it’s the foundation of trust, good communication, and mutual respect, all essential components of the boss-subordinate equation. If you want things with your boss to run like a well-oiled machine, which will help make your work life easier and hopefully open up the doors to new opportunities, you need to keep an open and honest line of communication.

Granted, this is sometimes easier said than done—all bosses are not created equal, and those of us who have had the misfortunate of working under the affectionately dubbed “challenging boss” know that these relationships often take a great deal of strategic finesse to manage properly. Also, not all situations present the opportunity for full disclosure and honesty in. While most of us don’t sweat taking our full and fair credit at moments of professional success and triumph, it’s not quite that easy to keep the floodgates of honesty wide open when things aren’t going so well. We get it—but it’s still important to make honesty your professional policy if you’re looking to climb up the career ladder and achieve your work goals.

If you’re looking to communicate more honestly with your boss, then consider using the following strategies for doing so effectively.

Know your boss

At a fundamental level, your relationship with your boss isn’t all that different from other relationships in your life. Yes, they may hold the key to the next step in your professional journey, but in terms of them being a person in your life whom you have to figure out how to deal with, you’ve been here before.

Difficult or easy, typically the best way to handle a boss is to first acknowledge the sort of person they are—including how best to effectively communicate with them. Then, use this information to your advantage. Do they like long meandering conversations or prefer you get straight to the point? Do they like talking over coffee or in conference rooms? Are they easier to pin down first thing in the morning or at the end of the day? Should you inject a little humor into things or is serious and buttoned up the best way to go?

Once you know your boss and are able to meet them on their own preferred terms, you’re setting up the groundwork and backdrop for an honest conversation that will go as pleasantly and positively as possible—and make sure you continue to adapt and modify this strategy as needed. With a little luck, your boss will actually look forward to communicating with you, which will make being honest in all sorts of situations that much easier.

Start small

Honesty doesn’t always come easy; in fact, for some of us who devote a great deal of time and effort to artfully spin reality into our preferred version of things, being honest can take some getting used to—especially with our bosses. If being honest is a challenge for you, we suggest you start small. Think of a relatively low-stakes conversation you need to have with your boss that requires some level of personal honesty (nothing too traumatic or anxiety inducing) and go for it. Practice it at first if need be, and do your best to remain sincere, humble, and likeable (once again, aim to meet them on their preferred terms). If this honest conversation goes well, then you’ve begun to lay a healthy groundwork for future honest conversations. Take this success and build from there.

Find a bright side

Most of us have been in a situation where things might not have gone according to plan and have to face our boss. This isn’t easy for anyone, regardless of tenure or level. When this happens and you’re planning out how to broach this with your boss, always remember that honesty is the best approach—and the one least likely to come back and bite you in unexpected ways. Don’t get defensive, don’t look to deflect blame, and don’t let negative emotions get the better of you. Instead, be humble, open, contrite, and sincere—and try to put a positive spin on the situation. Position it as a learning experience or an inflection point, and an opportunity to effect new and positive change and growth. Honesty isn’t always easy, and it might not always go smoothly, but trust us—it’s your best bet with your boss when confronted with a tough work situation.

Maintaining an honest flow of communication with your boss may not be easy at first, but it’s a worthwhile effort in order to bolster this essential work relationship—and hopefully it’ll get easier over time and come with a wealth of added professional benefits.

The post How to communicate honestly with your boss appeared first on TheJobNetwork.

How to actually get a job using a recruiter

If you’re on the job hunt or soon expect to be, you’re undoubtedly aware that you’re entering an ultra-competitive job market. Regardless of whether you’re a recent graduate and new to the workforce or a seasoned industry veteran, the level of talent out there is both impressive and intimidating—which is why you want to make […]

If you’re on the job hunt or soon expect to be, you’re undoubtedly aware that you’re entering an ultra-competitive job market. Regardless of whether you’re a recent graduate and new to the workforce or a seasoned industry veteran, the level of talent out there is both impressive and intimidating—which is why you want to make sure that you’re taking advantage of every tool in the job hunting arsenal in order to lock down your next career move.

One tool that you may or may not have considered are recruiters. These are individuals who are trained to meet the staffing needs of organizations across industries and job levels. They are skilled at funneling talent-rich groups of capable job recruits to the organizations who retain their services.

Some companies value recruiters so much that they have several working for them on a full-time basis. These professionals devote their time and effort to sourcing, engaging with, and attracting both active and passive potential candidates in an effort to cultivate an orbit of talent to turn to whenever an open position arises; other companies seek out the services of professional recruitment agencies when the need arises.

Depending on your industry and employment level, using recruiters to help you land your next job may be a solid strategy. Consider using the following tips and strategies to make the most of these valued resources during your job search.

Industry and job fairs

Many companies large and small, veteran and startup, make good use of job fairs in an effort to attract and engage with new prospective talent and help build their brand identities among their industry peers. You’ll find a range of opportunities to meet with recruiters at these events. The savviest job-seekers view these meet and greet opportunities as “mini initial interviews” of sorts:

  • They come professionally dressed and polished
  • They’re armed with their portfolios and resumes
  • They work hard to make memorable and significant connections with recruiters who represent companies they’re interested in potentially working for
  • They make sure to get business cards and/or contact information of the recruiters they interact with
  • They follow up later on (in the form of thank-you emails and possibly LinkedIn connections) and make sure to get (and stay) on the radars of the companies that intrigue them

Keep an eye and an ear out for industry events and job fairs in your area. Joining professional associations and making the most of social media for professional networking, along with regular online research, are your best chances to learn about these events and register in time.

School career services

Are you taking full advantage of everything your alma mater offers in terms of career resources for new and future graduates? Most colleges, universities, and vocational schools have career service offices that are dedicated to helping their student bodies land valuable internships and jobs upon graduation—these resources are often made available to alumni as well. Many school career service offices work directly with recruiters at various companies, which can be key strategic pipelines for them. If they can recognize the value of these resources, then perhaps you should too.

Your school’s career office can help you make direct connections with recruiters, and can also keep you updated on upcoming job fairs and events. (Many schools organize these activities throughout the year, and you can count on recruiters attending). Don’t forget—your tuition pays for all of the student and alumni services that your school offers, so why not take advantage of them?

Work independently

In addition to industry events, job fairs, and school career services offices, you can choose to connect directly with recruiters in an effort to land your next job. In addition to contacting the companies you are interested in directly (most companies these days have robust social media presences and career services portals on their websites that you can use to make key connections), there are professional recruitment agencies that specialize in placing individuals in open positions in various industries.

The Internet is your best friend here—do some online sleuthing regarding which respected and recognized recruiters specialize in your field, and consider making contact to see if they can help you achieve your career goals.

Here’s the bottom line—it’s true, you actually can get your next job by using a recruiter. Consider using the strategies and advice presented here to take advantage of this job-hunting resource and land your next great job.

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